homer

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Ho·mer

 (hō′mər) fl. c. 750 bc.
Greek epic poet. Two of the greatest works in Western literature, the Iliad and the Odyssey, are attributed to him.

hom·er 1

 (hō′mər)
n.
1. Baseball A home run.
2. A homing pigeon.
intr.v. ho·mer·ed, ho·mer·ing, ho·mers Baseball
To hit a home run: homered in the fifth inning.

ho·mer 2

 (hō′mər)
n.
A unit of capacity used by the ancient Hebrews, equal to 10 ephahs (about 10 bushels) or 10 baths (about 100 gallons). Also called kor.

[Hebrew ḥōmer, heap, homer; see ḥmr in Semitic roots.]

homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Animals) another word for homing pigeon
2. (Baseball) US and Canadian an informal word for home run

Homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Biography) c. 800 bc, Greek poet to whom are attributed the Iliad and the Odyssey. Almost nothing is known of him, but it is thought that he was born on the island of Chios and was blind
2. (Biography) Winslow. 1836–1910, US painter, noted for his seascapes and scenes of working life

hom•er1

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n., v. -ered, -er•ing. n. v.i.
3. to hit a home run.
[1865–70; home + -er1]

ho•mer2

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to ten baths in liquid measure or ten ephahs in dry measure. Also called kor.
[1525–35; < Hebrew ḥōmer literally, heap]

Ho•mer

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
1. 9th-century B.C. Greek epic poet: reputed author of the Iliad and Odyssey.
2. Winslow, 1836–1910, U.S. artist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homer - a base hit on which the batter scores a runhomer - a base hit on which the batter scores a run
base hit, safety - (baseball) the successful act of striking a baseball in such a way that the batter reaches base safely
solo blast, solo homer - a home run with no runners on base
2.Homer - ancient Greek epic poet who is believed to have written the Iliad and the Odyssey (circa 850 BC)
3.homer - an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to 10 baths or 10 ephahs
bath - an ancient Hebrew liquid measure equal to about 10 gallons
epha, ephah - an ancient Hebrew unit of dry measure equal to about a bushel
4.Homer - United States painter best known for his seascapes (1836-1910)
5.homer - pigeon trained to return homehomer - pigeon trained to return home  
domestic pigeon - domesticated pigeon raised for sport or food
carrier pigeon - a homing pigeon used to carry messages
Verb1.homer - hit a home run
rack up, score, tally, hit - gain points in a game; "The home team scored many times"; "He hit a home run"; "He hit .300 in the past season"
Translations
Homer
Homeros

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] NHomero

homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] N (Brit) → trabajo m fuera de hora, chollo m

Homer

nHomer m

homer

n
(= homing pigeon)Brieftaube f
(Brit inf: = job) → Nebenjob m (inf); to do something as a homeretw privat or nebenher machen

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] nOmero
even Homer nods → errare humanum est
References in classic literature ?
That age will be rich indeed when those relics which we call Classics, and the still older and more than classic but even less known Scriptures of the nations, shall have still further accumulated, when the Vaticans shall be filled with Vedas and Zendavestas and Bibles, with Homers and Dantes and Shakespeares, and all the centuries to come shall have successively deposited their trophies in the forum of the world.
The student may read Homer or AEschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages.
I proposed that Homer and Aristotle might appear at the head of all their commentators; but these were so numerous, that some hundreds were forced to attend in the court, and outward rooms of the palace.
Even when a treatise on medicine or natural science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet.
but the society of many families, which was first instituted for their lasting, mutual advantage, is called a village, and a village is most naturally composed of the descendants of one family, whom some persons call homogalaktes, the children and the children's children thereof: for which reason cities were originally governed by kings, as the barbarian states now are, which are composed of those who had before submitted to kingly government; for every family is governed by the elder, as are the branches thereof, on account of their relationship thereunto, which is what Homer says, "Each one ruled his wife and child;" and in this scattered manner they formerly lived.
Hence it is evident that a city is a natural production, and that man is naturally a political animal, and that whosoever is naturally and not accidentally unfit for society, must be either inferior or superior to man: thus the man in Homer, who is reviled for being "without society, without law, without family.
Pope need not have been jealous of Addison's friend, for his own translation of Homer was a great success, and people soon forgot the other.
Pope, but you must not call it Homer," said a friend** when he read it, and his judgment is still for the most part the judgment of to-day.
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.
Moreover, the noble but direct and simple spirit and language of Homer were as different as possible from the spirit and language of the London drawing-rooms for which Pope wrote; hence he not only expands, as every author of a verse-translation must do in filling out his lines, but inserts new ideas of his own and continually substitutes for Homer's expressions the periphrastic and, as he held, elegant ones of the pseudo-classic diction.
The publication of Pope's Homer marks an important stage in the development of authorship.
And so, you and Homer and Simonides are agreed that justice is an art of theft; to be practised however `for the good of friends and for the harm of enemies,'--that was what you were saying?