homesick


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home·sick

 (hōm′sĭk′)
adj.
Acutely longing for one's family or home.

home′sick′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

homesick

(ˈhəʊmˌsɪk)
adj
depressed or melancholy at being away from home and family
ˈhomeˌsickness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

home•sick

(ˈhoʊmˌsɪk)

adj.
sad from a longing for home or family while away from them.
[1790–1800]
home′sick`ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homesick - longing to return home
desirous, wishful - having or expressing desire for something; "desirous of high office"; "desirous of finding a quick solution to the problem"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُشْتاق إلى الوَطَنمُشْتَاقٌ لِلْوَطَنِ
stýskat setesknící po domově
have hjemve
koti-ikävää tunteva
nostalgičan
honvágya van
haldinn heimòrá
ホームシックの
향수병에 걸린
smútiaci za domovom
domotožen
ha hemlängtan
คิดถึงบ้าน
ev ve aile özlemisıla hasreti çekenvatan hasreti çeken
nhớ nhà

homesick

[ˈhəʊmsɪk] ADJ to be homesicktener morriña
I feel homesickecho de menos mi casa
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

homesick

[ˈhəʊmsɪk] adj
to be homesick (for a place)avoir le mal du pays; (missing one's family)s'ennuyer de sa famille
to be homesick for sth → avoir la nostalgie de qch
The smell of the grass made her homesick for her parents' farm → L'odeur de l'herbe lui donna la nostalgie de la ferme de ses parents.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

homesick

[ˈhəʊmˌsɪk] adj to be homesickavere la nostalgia, sentire la mancanza di casa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

home

(həum) noun
1. the house, town, country etc where a person etc usually lives. I work in London but my home is in Bournemouth; When I retire, I'll make my home in Bournemouth; Africa is the home of the lion; We'll have to find a home for the kitten.
2. the place from which a person, thing etc comes originally. America is the home of jazz.
3. a place where children without parents, old people, people who are ill etc live and are looked after. an old folk's home; a nursing home.
4. a place where people stay while they are working. a nurses' home.
5. a house. Crumpy Construction build fine homes for fine people; He invited me round to his home.
adjective
1. of a person's home or family. home comforts.
2. of the country etc where a person lives. home produce.
3. (in football) playing or played on a team's own ground. the home team; a home game.
adverb
1. to a person's home. I'm going home now; Hallo – I'm home!
2. completely; to the place, position etc a thing is intended to be. He drove the nail home; Few of his punches went home; These photographs of the war brought home to me the suffering of the soldiers.
ˈhomeless noun plural, adjective
(people) without a place to live in. This charity was set up to help the homeless; homeless people.
ˈhomely adjective
1. simple but pleasant. homely food.
2. making a person feel he is at home. a homely atmosphere.
3. (American) (of a person) not attractive; ugly.
ˈhomeliness noun
ˈhoming adjective
1. (of pigeons etc) which (can) fly home when set free a long way from home.
2. able to take a missile etc to its target. These torpedoes have homing devices in their noses.
ˈhome-coming noun
1. the return home of a person (who has been away for some time). We had a party to celebrate his home-coming.
2. (American) an annual event held by a college, a university or high school for former students.
ˌhome-ˈgrown adjective
grown in one's own garden or in one's own country. These tomatoes are home-grown.
ˈhomeland noun
a person's native land. Immigrants often weep for their homeland.
ˌhome-ˈmade adjective
made by a person at home; not professionally made. home-made jam; home-made furniture.
home rule
the government of a country or part of a country by its own citizens.
ˈhomesick adjective
missing one's home. When the boy first went to boarding-school he was very homesick.
ˈhomesickness noun
ˈhomestead (-sted) noun
a house, especially a farm, with the land and other buildings (eg barns) which belong to it, especially in the United States, Australia etc.
home truth
a plain statement of something which is unpleasant but true (about a person, his behaviour etc) said directly to the person. It's time someone told him a few home truths.
ˈhomeward adjective
going home. his homeward journey.
ˈhomeward(s) adverb
towards home. his journey homeward; He journeyed homewards.
ˈhomework noun
work or study done at home, especially by a school pupil. Finish your homework!
at home
1. in one's home. I'm afraid he's not at home.
2. (in football etc) in one's own ground. The team is playing at home today.
be/feel at home
to feel as relaxed as one does in one's own home or in a place or situation one knows well. I always feel at home in France; He's quite at home with cows – he used to live on a farm.
home in on
to move towards (a target etc). The missile is designed to home in on aircraft.
leave home
1. to leave one's house. I usually leave home at 7.30 a.m.
2. to leave one's home to go and live somewhere else. He left home at the age of fifteen to get a job in Australia.
make oneself at home
to make oneself as comfortable and relaxed as one would at home. Make yourself at home!
nothing to write home about
not very good. The concert was nothing to write home about.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

homesick

مُشْتَاقٌ لِلْوَطَنِ stýskat se have hjemve heimwehkrank νοσταλγός nostálgico koti-ikävää tunteva nostalgique du pays nostalgičan nostalgico ホームシックの 향수병에 걸린 lijdend aan heimwee ha hjemlengsel stęskniony za domem com saudade de casa, com saudades de casa тоскующий по дому ha hemlängtan คิดถึงบ้าน sıla hasreti çeken nhớ nhà 想家的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

homesick

adj nostálgico (del hogar); to be — sentir nostalgia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
She could not at first tell why she felt sad, but she became conscious at last of great longing to go home; then she knew she was homesick, although she was a thousand times better off with Mother Holle than with her mother and sister.
But I'm awful homesick. I'm homesick from ear-socket to crupper, and from crupper to hock-joint; but it ain't any use, I've got to stay here, till the old man drops the rag and give the word--yes, SIR, right here in this country I've got to linger till the old man says COME!--and you bet your bottom dollar, Johnny, it AIN'T just as easy as it is for a cat to have twins!"
We children who were used to the free range of woods and fields were homesick for the country in our narrow city yard, and I associate with this longing the 'Farmer's Boy of Bloomfield,' which my father got for me.
I've no intention of being homesick, I can tell you.
I don't think I was homesick. If we never arrived anywhere, it did not matter.
Poor little soul!--a pretty place this is ter put a homesick, lonesome child into!" she finished, going out and closing the door with a bang, "Oh!" she ejaculated, biting her lip.
It just makes a boy homesick to look ahead like that and see how far off summer is.
The mailman is to bring my trunk tomorrow; I just got homesick all at once, and came a day earlier.
I'm not afraid, but it seems as if I should be homesick for you even in heaven."
It made me homesick to look around over this proud and gaudy but heartless barrenness and remember that in our house in East Hartford, all unpretending as it was, you couldn't go into a room but you would find an insurance-chromo, or at least a three-color God-Bless-Our-Home over the door; and in the parlor we had nine.
He was thinking about his wife and his children, away up yonder, and he was low and homesick; because he hadn't ever been away from home before in his life; and I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks does for their'n.
Philip felt lonely in the world and strangely homesick. He wanted company.