homily

(redirected from homilies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hom·i·ly

 (hŏm′ə-lē)
n. pl. hom·i·lies
1. A sermon, especially one intended to explain the practical and moral implications of a particular scriptural passage.
2. A moralizing lecture or admonition that is often tedious or condescending.
3. A platitudinous or inspirational saying: "'Receiving is a form of giving,' she said, in one of those sudden banal homilies that came to her every now and again" (Willie Morris).

[Middle English omelie, from Old French, from Late Latin homīlia, from Greek homīliā, discourse, from homīlos, crowd; see sem- in Indo-European roots.]

hom′i·list n.

homily

(ˈhɒmɪlɪ)
n, pl -lies
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a sermon or discourse on a moral or religious topic
2. moralizing talk or writing
[C14: from Church Latin homīlia, from Greek: discourse, from homilein to converse with, from homilos crowd, from homou together + ilē crowd]
ˈhomilist n

hom•i•ly

(ˈhɒm ə li)

n., pl. -lies.
1. a sermon typically on a scriptural topic.
2. an admonitory or moralizing discourse.
3. an inspirational saying or cliché.
[1545–55; < Late Latin homīlia < Greek homīlía assembly, sermon =hómīl(os) crowd (hom(oû) together + -īlos, comb. form of ilē crowd)]

homily

a sermon or serious admonition. — homilist, homilete, n.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homily - a sermon on a moral or religious topichomily - a sermon on a moral or religious topic
preaching, sermon, discourse - an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)

homily

noun sermon, talk, address, speech, lecture, preaching, discourse, oration, declamation a receptive audience for his homily on moral values
Translations
homilia

homily

[ˈhɒmɪlɪ] N (homilies (pl)) → homilía f (fig) → sermón m

homily

[ˈhɒmɪli] nhomélie f

homily

nPredigt f; (fig also)Sermon m (pej)

homily

[ˈhɒmɪlɪ] n (frm) → omelia
References in classic literature ?
It shows itself in acts rather than in words, and has more influence than homilies or protestations.
Haphazard among the sermons and homilies, the travels, the lives of the Saints, the Fathers, the histories of the church, were old-fashioned novels; and these Philip at last discovered.
"And monseigneur composed his homilies -- no, I mean his sermons -- with monsieur le surintendant."
"You should have heard my homilies to the good town's-people.
Sick-bed homilies and pious reflections are, to be sure, out of place in mere story-books, and we are not going (after the fashion of some novelists of the present day) to cajole the public into a sermon, when it is only a comedy that the reader pays his money to witness.
Connect with homilies during Simbang Gabi, youth told !-- -- Evelyn Macairan (The Philippine Star) - December 16, 2018 - 12:00am MANILA, Philippines While many of today's youth turn Simbang Gabi or dawn mass into "Simbang Date," an official of the Archdiocese of Manila yesterday remained hopeful that they would be moved by the Holy Spirit and be able to connect with the homilies.
Summary: New Delhi [India], Dec 9 (ANI): Hitting out at National Conference (NC) chairman Farooq Abdullah for belittling the Ram temple construction issue, senior Janata Dal-United (JD-U) leader Pavan Varma on Sunday advised the former not to give homilies to Hindus.
Each conference in the series focuses on a particular work of Gregory's (335-395), and this one considered his 15 Homilies In Canticum Canticorum.
Roman Catholic faithful all over the world are grateful to Pope Francis for pointedly 'suggesting' a 10-minute length limit for Sunday Mass homilies or sermons.
An official of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) urged priests on Thursday to deliver substantial homilies rather than striving to entertain parishioners during Simbang Gabi masses.
Dupont's doctoral studies focused on the interplay between Augustine of Hippo's notions of divine grace and human free will during the Pelagian controversy and the ways in which the homilies provide some balance to the almost exclusive emphasis on divine grace in Augustine's doctrinal writings.