homocentric


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ho·mo·cen·tric

 (hō′mə-sĕn′trĭk, hŏm′ə-)
adj.
Having the same center.

homocentric

(ˌhəʊməʊˈsɛntrɪk; ˌhɒm-)
adj
having the same centre; concentric
ˌhomoˈcentrically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homocentric - having a common center; "concentric rings"
References in periodicals archive ?
The seeming incongruity of this merger of an objective scientific instrument with a column designed in accordance with the classical tradition of homocentric idealism is a reminder that similar confrontations occurred throughout the intellectual disciplines during this century of change.
The subtle fluidity of heterocentric and homocentric perspective in medieval literature has been amply demonstrated.
This replacement of a theocentric way of studying and exploring the world of nature with a profane and homocentric science has produced an irreversible crisis marked by destruction and disequilibrium of the interconnected systems of nature.
Papal teaching on ecology is almost exclusively homocentric.
a rim is left appearing during mid-eclipse' as a proof against the idea of homocentric planetary spheres.
Two of Stephanson's conclusions underscore this reading: first, he finds that the language of what he terms "epicoene friendship" was not mutually exclusive with homophobic beliefs; second, he argues that these letters could also reflect "scenarios of a shared phallic aggression in which male friends traffic in figurative women or exchange female principles within a homocentric erotic economy" (160; 162).
Forster and Wendy Moffat's new, homocentric biography, A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E.
The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (Wehmeier 2002:551) resonates with both a relativist-functionalist and a homocentric view in that it defines health as the condition of a person's body or mind, the state of being physically and mentally healthy, and able to function optimally within all of these dimensions.
Of particular interest to the history of Islamic scientific tradition is Article VIII, "Ibn al-Haytham's Homocentric Epicycles in Latin Astronomical Texts of the XIVth and Vth Centuries".
In a limited way, mainly through scientific and economic developments, a certain set of values came to be associated with Renaissance humanism; namely those of the homocentric or man-centred world where individual psychology came to be seen as part of the larger configuration of forces of creation and destruction; Shakespeare's Macbeth is a tragedy wherein the acute and irresolvable contradictions of the political and psychological subject lead to insanity and death.