homocentric


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ho·mo·cen·tric

 (hō′mə-sĕn′trĭk, hŏm′ə-)
adj.
Having the same center.

homocentric

(ˌhəʊməʊˈsɛntrɪk; ˌhɒm-)
adj
having the same centre; concentric
ˌhomoˈcentrically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homocentric - having a common center; "concentric rings"
References in periodicals archive ?
His homocentric, erotic love stories were the first films of their kind to be shown in public movie theaters.
In comparison to other French thinkers whose traditional thought paradigms were too homocentric to have anything of substance to contribute to the most pressing issue of our time, Serres realized the urgency of the situation immediately.
Consequently, the idea that the EU can integrate into its core productive system successive homocentric rounds of geographically more and more dispersed and economically less and less developed areas without altering the basic model of integration and without incurring any costs for anyone, needs to be reexamined.
The seeming incongruity of this merger of an objective scientific instrument with a column designed in accordance with the classical tradition of homocentric idealism is a reminder that similar confrontations occurred throughout the intellectual disciplines during this century of change.
The subtle fluidity of heterocentric and homocentric perspective in medieval literature has been amply demonstrated.
The first is homocentric which explains that research and technology would explain all needs of animals, while the second is biocentric which holds the reality that animals should be kept at semi-natural environmental conditions in social bonds.
This replacement of a theocentric way of studying and exploring the world of nature with a profane and homocentric science has produced an irreversible crisis marked by destruction and disequilibrium of the interconnected systems of nature.
Papal teaching on ecology is almost exclusively homocentric.
a rim is left appearing during mid-eclipse' as a proof against the idea of homocentric planetary spheres.
Two of Stephanson's conclusions underscore this reading: first, he finds that the language of what he terms "epicoene friendship" was not mutually exclusive with homophobic beliefs; second, he argues that these letters could also reflect "scenarios of a shared phallic aggression in which male friends traffic in figurative women or exchange female principles within a homocentric erotic economy" (160; 162).
It was a surprise to him and to all who knew his works, because the book questioned not just our homocentric presumptuousness, but also the misguided cultural and religious values that gave it root.