homoeoptoton

homoeoptoton

a rhetorical device consisting of the repetition of the same case endings, inflections, etc., at the end of phrases.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
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References in periodicals archive ?
He accents this through homoeoptoton, the use of two or more words with like terminations in the same sentence: cadenti, "falling," and ruenti, "coming down" (lit.
Sulpicius highlights the reaction of the crowd in general as well as that of the pagans and monks through a threefold parallelism combined with homoeoptoton. We hear a shout going up to heaven (in caelum clamore sublato), a gasping of the pagans at the sight of such a miracle (gentiles stupere miraculo), and the monks weeping for joy (monachi flere prae gaudio).
Here Sulpicius emphasizes the contrast between "human hands" and "divine power" through parallelism supported by homoeoptoton. He places two parallel phrases in relation to the temple: "that human hands had failed to demolish" and "might be destroyed by divine power." The verbs ending each phrase have like terminations: non potuisset and diveret.