homonym

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homonym

a word the same as another in sound and spelling but different in meaning such as light, meaning either illumination or of little weight
Not to be confused with:
homographs – words that are spelled identically but may or may not share a pronunciation, such as sow (so) meaning to scatter seed, and sow (sou) meaning an adult female swine
homophones – words that sound alike whether or not they are spelled differently: holy and wholly
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

hom·o·nym

 (hŏm′ə-nĭm′, hō′mə-)
n.
1. One of two or more words that have the same sound and often the same spelling but differ in meaning, such as bank (embankment) and bank (place where money is kept).
2.
a. A word used to designate several different things.
b. A namesake.
3. Biology A taxonomic name identical to one previously applied to a different species or other taxon and therefore unacceptable in its new use.

[Latin homōnymum, from Greek homōnumon, from neuter of homōnumos, homonymous; see homonymous.]

hom′o·nym′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

homonym

(ˈhɒmənɪm)
n
1. (Linguistics) one of a group of words pronounced or spelt in the same way but having different meanings. Compare homograph, homophone
2. a person with the same name as another
3. (Biology) biology a name for a species or genus that should be unique but has been used for two or more different organisms
[C17: from Latin homōnymum, from Greek homōnumon, from homōnumos of the same name; see homo-, -onym]
ˌhomoˈnymic, hoˈmonymous adj
ˌhomoˈnymity, hoˈmonymy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hom•o•nym

(ˈhɒm ə nɪm)

n.
2. a word the same as another in sound and spelling but different in meaning, as chase “to pursue” and chase “to ornament metal.”
4. a namesake.
[1635–45; < Latin homōnymum < Greek homṓnymon, neuter of homṓnymos homonymous]
hom`o•nym′ic, adj.
syn: homonym, homophone, and homograph designate words that are identical to other words in spelling or pronunciation, or both, while differing from them in meaning and usu. in origin. homophones are words that sound alike, whether or not they are spelled differently. The words pear “fruit,” pare “cut off,” and pair “two of a kind” are homophones that are different in spelling; bear “carry; support” and bear “animal” are homophones that are spelled alike. homographs are words that are spelled identically but may or may not share a pronunciation. Spruce “tree” and spruce “neat” are homographs, but so are row (rō) “line” and row (rou) “fight” as well as sewer (so̅o̅′ər) “conduit for waste” and sewer (sō′ər) “person who sews.” homonyms are, in the strictest sense, both homophones and homographs, alike in spelling and pronunciation, as the two forms bear. homonym, however, is used more frequently than homophone, a technical term, when referring to words with the same pronunciation without regard to spelling. homonym is also used as a synonym of homograph. Thus, it has taken on a broader scope than either of the other two terms and is often the term of choice in a nontechnical context.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

homonym

A word with the same sound (and sometimes the same spelling) as another word but with a different meaning.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homonym - two words are homonyms if they are pronounced or spelled the same way but have different meanings
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
homograph - two words are homographs if they are spelled the same way but differ in meaning (e.g. fair)
homophone - two words are homophones if they are pronounced the same way but differ in meaning or spelling or both (e.g. bare and bear)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
homonymum
enslydende ord
homonim
homonima
eins-/samhljóîa
同音異義語同音語
homonimas
homonīms
homonymum
homonym
eş seslisesdeş

homonym

[ˈhɒmənɪm] Nhomónimo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

homonym

nHomonym nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

homonym

[ˈhɒmənɪm] nomonimo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

homonym

(ˈhomənim) noun
a word having the same sound as another word, but a different meaning. The words `there' and `their' are homonyms.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) But even this would not tell us much more than that the principals were in middle age; we really cannot say more about any of these people on present evidence, not even to explain the unusual homonymity of the Beltani's.
It's an extreme example of what Noam Chomsky called "constructional homonymity," that is, a grammar permitting the construction of "nonequivalent derivations for a given sentence," which is to say that the sentence is ambiguous, but syntactically ambiguous (as opposed to semantic ambiguity).