homophyly

homophyly

(hɒˈmɒfəlɪ)
n
(Biology) resemblance due to common ancestry
[C19: from Greek, from homo- + phylum]
homophyllic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Hear him: "Whenever you intend to communicate as a leader, you should assess not only the information you want to impart but also the human relations aspects of how you will go imparting it ..." Yes, you must have in place some kind of homophyly, a degree of shared experience and commonness, and an air of civility.
We used two homophyly items to operationalize the cultural similarity, following McCroskey, Richmond, and Daly (1975), and Lin and Germain (1998).
Mr Wacker floats from the Zeitgeist to homophyly - whatever they are.
Apparently homophyly does not mean you are a homosexual resident of Philadelphia but the tendency of two cells when touching to take on the other's characteristics.
In their book, Wacker and Taylor also talk about the notion of "homophyly," which Wacker describes as "the tendency of objects, when in close proximity, to assume the characteristics of each other." He says, "I think we're at the point of cultural schizophrenia, where people have the ability to move in two directions at a time without it feeling strange' because the world is becoming both more the same and more different.
Mr Wacker, who aims to be a visionary in the tradition of media theorist Marshall Macluhan or Future Shock author Alvin Toffler, delights in new meanings - repeating modish-sounding phrases like "New York, Mythopolis, Centre of the Universe", "the Zeitgeist" or "homophyly".