honey fungus


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honey fungus

n
(Plants) an edible basidiomycetous fungus, Armillaria mellea, having a yellow-spotted cap and wrinkled stems, parasitic on the roots of woody plants, which it may kill by root rot. It spreads by thin black underground strands. Also called: bootlace fungus
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.honey fungus - a honey-colored edible mushroom commonly associated with the roots of trees in late summer and fallhoney fungus - a honey-colored edible mushroom commonly associated with the roots of trees in late summer and fall; do not eat raw
agaric - a saprophytic fungus of the order Agaricales having an umbrellalike cap with gills on the underside
Armillariella, genus Armillariella - a honey-colored diminutive form of genus Armillaria; grows in clusters; edible (when cooked) but most attention has been on how to get rid of it
Translations
mesisieni
honungsskivling
References in periodicals archive ?
HOOTON: At 2B Hooton Way Steven Harrop is proposing to fell a protected horse chestnut tree due to honey fungus disease.
Rachael Watson your tree is dead, most likely killed by a AUNFORTUNATELY disease such as honey fungus or a type of canker.
Rachael Watson, via email Dear Rachael Unfortunately your tree is dead, most likely killed by a disease such as honey fungus or a type of canker.
Ash trees with dieback - also known as Chalara dieback - are more susceptible to honey fungus infection, which destabilises the tree and makes them prone to falling, according to SWT.
The monster mushroom, popularly known as the honey fungus, stretches 3.5 miles, covering an area as big as 1,665 football fields.
According to the notice the tree had shown signs of being riddled with honey fungus which rots the roots of trees, making them unstable and at risk of toppling.
A WHILE a stump could be used to support a climber, it is best to remove them as stumps can foster root diseases such as honey fungus.
My son found a link to BBC reports about a humongous honey fungus growing in the Blue Mountains in Oregon.
The first gave us many years of pleasure but eventually succumbed, probably to honey fungus.
vitellinus as two separate species and recognized all five different species of Armillaria (honey fungus), when these had been put together by the rest of the early mycologists.
Myth: Ivy kills trees Guy said: "Ivy seldom kills trees itself, but the presence of ivy indicates root disease - especially honey fungus - that is doing serious harm to the host and allowing the ivy to flourish."
| Myth - ivy kills trees Ivy is thought to seldom kill trees itself, but the presence of ivy indicates the very strong suspicion of root disease, especially honey fungus doing serious harm to the host and allowing the ivy to flourish under the diminished canopy.