honky-tonk


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hon·ky-tonk

 (hông′kē-tôngk′, hŏng′kē-tŏngk′)
n.
A cheap, noisy bar or dance hall.
adj.
1. Of or relating to such a bar or dance hall; tawdry: a honky-tonk district; honky-tonk entertainers.
2. Of, relating to, or being a type of ragtime characteristically played on a tinny-sounding piano or in a honky-tonk.
intr.v. hon·ky-tonked, hon·ky-tonk·ing, hon·ky-tonks
To visit cheap, noisy bars or dance halls.

[Perhaps from honk.]

honky-tonk

(ˈhɒŋkɪˌtɒŋk)
n
1. slang
a. a cheap disreputable nightclub, bar, etc
b. (as modifier): a honky-tonk district.
2. (Jazz) a style of ragtime piano-playing, esp on a tinny-sounding piano
3. (Music, other) a type of country music, usually performed by a small band with electric and steel guitars
4. (Music, other) (as modifier): honky-tonk music.
[C19: rhyming compound based on honk]

honk•y-tonk

(ˈhɒŋ kiˌtɒŋk, ˈhɔŋ kiˌtɔŋk)

n., adj., v. -tonked, -tonk•ing. n.
1. a cheap, noisy, garish nightclub or dance hall.
adj.
2. of or characteristic of a honky-tonk.
3. characterized by honky-tonks: the honky-tonk part of town.
4. of or pertaining to ragtime music played on a tinny-sounding upright piano.
v.i.
5. to visit honky-tonks.
Also, honk′y-tonk`y.
[1890–95, orig. uncertain]

honky-tonk

- May come from the New England dialect word honk, "to idle about," and is a rhyming duplication.
See also related terms for idleness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.honky-tonk - a cheap drinking and dancing establishmenthonky-tonk - a cheap drinking and dancing establishment
bar, barroom, ginmill, saloon, taproom - a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar"

honky-tonk

noun
Slang. A disreputable or run-down bar or restaurant:
Slang: dive, joint.
Translations

honky-tonk

[ˈhɒŋkɪˌtɒŋk] N
1. (US) (= club) → garito m
2. (Mus) → honky-tonk m

honky-tonk

n (US inf: = country-music bar) → Schuppen m (inf)
adj music, pianoschräg; honky-tonk barSchuppen m (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
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