honky-tonk


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hon·ky-tonk

 (hông′kē-tôngk′, hŏng′kē-tŏngk′)
n.
A cheap, noisy bar or dance hall.
adj.
1. Of or relating to such a bar or dance hall; tawdry: a honky-tonk district; honky-tonk entertainers.
2. Of, relating to, or being a type of ragtime characteristically played on a tinny-sounding piano or in a honky-tonk.
intr.v. hon·ky-tonked, hon·ky-tonk·ing, hon·ky-tonks
To visit cheap, noisy bars or dance halls.

[Perhaps from honk.]

honky-tonk

(ˈhɒŋkɪˌtɒŋk)
n
1. slang
a. a cheap disreputable nightclub, bar, etc
b. (as modifier): a honky-tonk district.
2. (Jazz) a style of ragtime piano-playing, esp on a tinny-sounding piano
3. (Music, other) a type of country music, usually performed by a small band with electric and steel guitars
4. (Music, other) (as modifier): honky-tonk music.
[C19: rhyming compound based on honk]

honk•y-tonk

(ˈhɒŋ kiˌtɒŋk, ˈhɔŋ kiˌtɔŋk)

n., adj., v. -tonked, -tonk•ing. n.
1. a cheap, noisy, garish nightclub or dance hall.
adj.
2. of or characteristic of a honky-tonk.
3. characterized by honky-tonks: the honky-tonk part of town.
4. of or pertaining to ragtime music played on a tinny-sounding upright piano.
v.i.
5. to visit honky-tonks.
Also, honk′y-tonk`y.
[1890–95, orig. uncertain]

honky-tonk

- May come from the New England dialect word honk, "to idle about," and is a rhyming duplication.
See also related terms for idleness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.honky-tonk - a cheap drinking and dancing establishmenthonky-tonk - a cheap drinking and dancing establishment
bar, barroom, ginmill, saloon, taproom - a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar"

honky-tonk

noun
Slang. A disreputable or run-down bar or restaurant:
Slang: dive, joint.
Translations

honky-tonk

[ˈhɒŋkɪˌtɒŋk] N
1. (US) (= club) → garito m
2. (Mus) → honky-tonk m

honky-tonk

n (US inf: = country-music bar) → Schuppen m (inf)
adj music, pianoschräg; honky-tonk barSchuppen m (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
He experienced his first success on the charts with "Room Full of Roses," and his other hits included "Stand By Me," ''Window Up Above" and the honky-tonk anthem "Don't the Girls All Get Prettier at Closing Time.
00pm Venue: Market Square, Lisburn Featuring toe tapping fun from The Blueridge Honky-Tonk and harvest themed activity from Kathleen's Attic.
The Broken Spoke: Austin's Legendary Honky-Tonk follows the history of a local Texas establishment first opened in 1964, a mile south of the Austin city limits, which became a mainstay of good food and country music.
Combining the best aspects of honky-tonk with a dash of '50s pop, South Texas Suite will thrill any country music purist.
Classic honky-tonk country is the backbone of Dale Watson's sound.
Demonstrators went past the White House in Washington DC, along iconic Fifth Avenue in New York and through the middle of Nashville's honky-tonk district.
George Jones, the "King of Broken Hearts," whose honky-tonk balladry defined the highest level of emotion-wracked country singing, died April 26 in Nashville.
Two versions of the song were recorded by the band: the familiar hit which appeared on the 45 single and a honky-tonk version entitled Country Honk with slightly different lyrics, which appeared on Let It Bleed.
THE Bluecoat may be 4,000 miles from Nashville, but on Saturday it will be transformed into the home of honky-tonk for its Above the Beaten Track music festival.
There may be no radio-friendly standouts but the end result - all dirty guitars, drawling vocals and honky-tonk piano - is a pure distillation of the messy, joyous essence of rock'n'roll itself, the Stones' finest.
Standouts include the wailing honky-tonk of Waylon Jennings' "Stop the World and Let Me Off" and Porter Wagoner's toe-tapping revenge saga "The Cold Hard Facts of Life.
cheesy outfits, honky-tonk tunes, targets for animal rights activists,