hooded crow

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Related to hooded crows: carrion crow

hooded crow

n
(Animals) a subspecies of the carrion crow, Corvus corone cornix, that has a grey body and black head, wings, and tail. Also called (Scot): hoodie or hoodie crow
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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By God and St Dennis, an ye pay not the richer ransom, I will hang ye up by the feet from the iron bars of these windows, till the kites and hooded crows have made skeletons of you!
We may safely attribute the greater wildness of our large birds to this cause; for in uninhabited islands large birds are not more fearful than small; and the magpie, so wary in England, is tame in Norway, as is the hooded crow in Egypt.
However, I do acknowledge that crows and in particular hooded crows and in hill country, ravens, can go beyond the pail and commit some pretty dastardly deeds such as attacking the eyes and tongues of newly born lambs.
Mediterranean Gulls were there too, and on the Clwyd estuary, while Hooded Crows are at Bull Bay and RSPB South Stack.
Further testing by DNA sequencing revealed a lineage previously reported in hooded crows (Corvus corone comix) in Italy (L-CORNIX02, GenBank KJ128987) and Japan (GenBank AB741497), and in carrion crows (Corvus corone) in Germany (Cc_L2, GenBank MF189963).
There may well be crows here, large black birds, their vociferous cousins the gray and black Hooded Crows so familiar in Cairo and elsewhere.
Hooded Crows have been recorded in late spring or summer, but no signs of reproduction have been observed.
Two hooded crows in a lab have wowed their human colleagues by passing a test designed to see whether animals can grasp analogies.
Archie also lived in fear of the town's hooded crows, forcing him to resort to finding scraps of food at the supermarkets.
In their behavior gulls are in many respects similar to hooded crows, birds with complex, highly plastic behavior (Konstantinov, 1992) and a highly-organized brain (with a Portmann Hemisphere Index of 14.99 (1)) (Portmann, 1947), that are able to solve the most complicated cognitive tasks in experiments under laboratory conditions (Zorina & Smirnova, 1995; 2008; Smirnova, Lazareva, & Zorina, 1998; 2002).
1982: Territorial hooded crows as predators on willow ptarmigan nests.--Journal of Wildlife Management 46: 109-114.