hoopoe

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Related to hoopoes: African Hoopoe

hoo·poe

 (ho͞o′po͞o, -pō)
n.
Any of several birds of the family Upupidae found in Eurasia and Africa, especially Upupa epops, having distinctively patterned plumage, a fanlike crest, and a slender, downward-curving bill.

[Alteration (influenced by Latin ūpupa) of obsolete hoop, from French huppe, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *ūppa, alteration of Latin upupa, ūpupa, of imitative origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hoopoe

(ˈhuːpuː)
n
(Animals) an Old World bird, Upupa epops, having a pinkish-brown plumage with black-and-white wings and an erectile crest: family Upupidae, order Coraciiformes (kingfishers, etc)
[C17: from earlier hoopoop, of imitative origin; compare Latin upupa]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hoo•poe

(ˈhu pu)

n.
an Old World bird with an erectile, fanlike crest, Upupa epops, comprising the sole member of the family Upupidae.
[1660–70; variant of obsolete hoopoop (imitative), c. Low German huppup; compare Latin upupa]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hoopoe - any of several crested Old World birds with a slender downward-curved billhoopoe - any of several crested Old World birds with a slender downward-curved bill
coraciiform bird - chiefly short-legged arboreal nonpasserine birds that nest in holes
Euopean hoopoe, Upupa epops - pinkish-brown hoopoe with black-and-white wings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
هدهد
dudek
harjalintu
pupăză
çavuş kuşuhüthütibibik

hoopoe

[ˈhuːpuː] Nabubilla f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hoopoe

nWiedehopf m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hoopoe

[ˈhuːpuː] nupupa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoopoes are colourful birds found across Afro-Eurasia and have a distinctive crown of feathers.
Hoopoes haven't bred in the UK for several decades, and fewer than a hundred are seen in the UK and Ireland each year, with those numbers varying considerably.
Up to 100 hoopoes are seen in Britain every year, but only because they have overshot and somehow ended up on the wrong side of the North Sea.
Hoopoes were sacred in ancient Egypt and carvings have been found in tombs.
Rare hoopoes again nest on the island and fishes spawn in the re-opened Danube arm.While gold was once the main asset of this region, the foremost reason to visit Ve#318koleacutelsky Island in the Danube River near the southern Slovak town of Komaacuterno today are its restored pastures and unique nature.
Hemingway also mentions hoopoes at the beginning of "A Natural History of the Dead."
Birds that come to Kuwait's skies include eagles, hoopoes, cranes and flamingos.
The aim of the study is to get a representative picture of the diet composition of hoopoes in vineyards as specific man made habitats in Central Europe.
Hoopoes can survive cold weather - they can be found in France where temperatures do drop during the winter."
hoopoes, hummingbirds, kingfishers, finches, sparrows, swallows, warblers, orioles ...
I particularly enjoyed reading about her sitting on the terrace watching the Hoopoes because those birds are beautiful -- we have had a Hoopoe family visiting us every summer for the last five years and they are watch-worthy.
Highlights of the week have been two Hoopoes, at RSPB South Stack and on Bardsey, a Great White Egret at RSPB Malltraeth Marsh and a pair of Garganeys - our only summer migrant duck - in fields west of Holyhead.