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hop 1

v. hopped, hop·ping, hops
a. To move with light bounding skips or leaps.
b. Informal To move quickly or be busily active: The shipping department is hopping this week.
2. To jump on one foot or with both feet at the same time.
3. To make a quick trip, especially in an airplane.
4. To travel or move often from place to place. Often used in combination: party-hop.
1. To move over by hopping: hop a ditch two feet wide.
2. Informal To get on (a train) surreptitiously in order to ride without paying a fare: hop a freight train.
a. A light springy jump or leap, especially on one foot or with both feet at the same time.
b. A rebound: The ball took a bad hop.
2. Informal A dance or dance party.
a. A short distance.
b. A short trip, especially by air.
4. A free ride; a lift.
hop, skip, and (a) jump
A short distance.
hop to it
To begin an activity or a task quickly and energetically.

[Middle English hoppen, from Old English hoppian.]

hop 2

1. A twining vine (Humulus lupulus) having lobed leaves and green female flowers arranged in conelike spikes.
2. hops The dried female inflorescences of this plant, containing a bitter aromatic oil. They are used in brewing to inhibit bacterial growth and to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer.
3. Slang Opium.
tr.v. hopped, hop·ping, hops
To flavor with hops.
Phrasal Verb:
hop up Slang
1. To increase the power or energy of: hop up a car.
2. To stimulate with or as if with a narcotic.

[Middle English hoppe, from Middle Dutch.]

hop′py adj.


high oxygen pressure


pl n
(Plants) the dried ripe flowers, esp the female flowers, of the hop plant, used to give a bitter taste to beer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hops - twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikeshops - twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikes; the dried flowers of this plant are used in brewing to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer
genus Humulus, Humulus - hops: hardy perennial vines of Europe, North America and central and eastern Asia producing a latex sap; in some classifications included in the family Urticaceae
bine, common hop, common hops, European hop, Humulus lupulus - European twining plant whose flowers are used chiefly to flavor malt liquors; cultivated in America
American hop, Humulus americanus - native American plant sometimes confused with the European hop
Humulus japonicus, Japanese hop - ornamental vine native to eastern Asia; cultivated for its variegated foliage
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface


[ˈhɒps] nplhoublon m


[hɒps] nplconi mpl di luppolo


n (bot) lúpulo
References in classic literature ?
Steerforth said) than the lowest boy in the school; that he had been, a good many years ago, a small hop-dealer in the Borough, and had taken to the schooling business after being bankrupt in hops, and making away with Mrs.
JEREMY put on a macintosh, and a pair of shiny goloshes; he took his rod and basket, and set off with enormous hops to the place where he kept his boat.
The cuts, thrusts, down strokes, back strokes and doubles, that Corchuelo delivered were past counting, and came thicker than hops or hail.
Instead of progressing in a sane and dignified manner, my attempts to walk resulted in a variety of hops which took me clear of the ground a couple of feet at each step and landed me sprawling upon my face or back at the end of each second or third hop.
Athos, do you know any inn in the whole town where one can find white sheets, roast beef reasonably cooked, and wine which is not made of hops and gin?
Indeed, in the excitement of the moment, they were loud and extravagant in their commendations of "the mountain tap"; elevating it above every beverage produced from hops or malt.
The ball swings round and round like a planet, slows down, stumbles among the holes, rests for a moment in the one which you have backed, then hops into the next one, and you lose.
Like a bird which alights nowhere, but hops perpetually from bough to bough, is the Power which abides in no man and in no woman, but for a moment speaks from this one, and for another moment from that one.
He suggested that Philip should join him and his family in the Kentish hop-field to which he went every year; and to persuade him said various beautiful and complicated things about Philip's soul and the winding tendrils of the hops.
All the air was cool and fresh; the harvests were gathered home, the young birds were full fledged, the hops were plucked, and apples were ripe.
He was Kentish and English, and that meant hops, beer, dog-rose's, and the sort of sunshine that was best in the world.
I should not allow any one to travel until they had visited Kent and Dorsetshire-- Kent for the hops, and Dorsetshire for its old stone cottages.