hops


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hop 1

 (hŏp)
v. hopped, hop·ping, hops
v.intr.
1.
a. To move with light bounding skips or leaps.
b. Informal To move quickly or be busily active: The shipping department is hopping this week.
2. To jump on one foot or with both feet at the same time.
3. To make a quick trip, especially in an airplane.
4. To travel or move often from place to place. Often used in combination: party-hop.
v.tr.
1. To move over by hopping: hop a ditch two feet wide.
2. Informal To get on (a train) surreptitiously in order to ride without paying a fare: hop a freight train.
n.
1.
a. A light springy jump or leap, especially on one foot or with both feet at the same time.
b. A rebound: The ball took a bad hop.
2. Informal A dance or dance party.
3.
a. A short distance.
b. A short trip, especially by air.
4. A free ride; a lift.
Idioms:
hop, skip, and (a) jump
A short distance.
hop to it
To begin an activity or a task quickly and energetically.

[Middle English hoppen, from Old English hoppian.]

hop 2

 (hŏp)
n.
1. A twining vine (Humulus lupulus) having lobed leaves and green female flowers arranged in conelike spikes.
2. hops The dried female inflorescences of this plant, containing a bitter aromatic oil. They are used in brewing to inhibit bacterial growth and to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer.
3. Slang Opium.
tr.v. hopped, hop·ping, hops
To flavor with hops.
Phrasal Verb:
hop up Slang
1. To increase the power or energy of: hop up a car.
2. To stimulate with or as if with a narcotic.

[Middle English hoppe, from Middle Dutch.]

hop′py adj.

HOP

abbr.
high oxygen pressure

hops

(hɒps)
pl n
(Plants) the dried ripe flowers, esp the female flowers, of the hop plant, used to give a bitter taste to beer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hops - twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikeshops - twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikes; the dried flowers of this plant are used in brewing to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer
genus Humulus, Humulus - hops: hardy perennial vines of Europe, North America and central and eastern Asia producing a latex sap; in some classifications included in the family Urticaceae
bine, common hop, common hops, European hop, Humulus lupulus - European twining plant whose flowers are used chiefly to flavor malt liquors; cultivated in America
American hop, Humulus americanus - native American plant sometimes confused with the European hop
Humulus japonicus, Japanese hop - ornamental vine native to eastern Asia; cultivated for its variegated foliage
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Translations

hops

[ˈhɒps] nplhoublon m

hops

[hɒps] nplconi mpl di luppolo

hops

n (bot) lúpulo
References in classic literature ?
Usually at the weekly hops Maggie kept a spot on the wall warm with her back.
Eevery Saturday night the Clover Leaf Social Club gave a hop in the hall of the Give and Take Athletic Association on the East Side.
A grasshopper does not only turn: it hops! It hops!
"If, in two minutes, mademoiselle, you have not turned the scorpion, I shall turn the grasshopper...and the grasshopper, I tell you, HOPS JOLLY HIGH!"
This he did in a series of hops, and he moved so swiftly in this strange manner that those with two legs had to run to keep up with him.
JEREMY put on a macintosh, and a pair of shiny goloshes; he took his rod and basket, and set off with enormous hops to the place where he kept his boat.
He suggested that Philip should join him and his family in the Kentish hop-field to which he went every year; and to persuade him said various beautiful and complicated things about Philip's soul and the winding tendrils of the hops. Philip replied at once that he would come on the first day he was free.
"Shucks, I only meant you'd SEE 'em -- not hopping, of course -- what do they want to hop for?
Hop Higgins, the night watchman, was partially awake.
"We're on our way to Fuddlecumjig, and you may hop along beside us."
Then Josie Pye dared Jane Andrews to hop on her left leg around the garden without stopping once or putting her right foot to the ground; which Jane Andrews gamely tried to do, but gave out at the third corner and had to confess herself defeated.
March glanced at Jo as she spoke, but the face opposite seemed quite unconscious of any secret disquietude but Beth's, and after sewing thoughtfully for a minute, Jo said, "I think she is growing up, and so begins to dream dreams, and have hopes and fears and fidgets, without knowing why or being able to explain them.