diplopia

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Related to horizontal diplopia: double vision

di·plo·pi·a

 (dĭ-plō′pē-ə)
di·plo′pic (-plō′pĭk, dĭ-plŏp′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diplopia

(dɪˈpləʊpɪə)
n
(Pathology) a visual defect in which a single object is seen in duplicate; double vision. It can be caused by incorrect fixation or by an abnormality in the visual system
[C19: New Latin, from diplo- + Greek ōps eye]
diplopic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•plo•pi•a

(dɪˈploʊ pi ə)

n.
a pathological condition of vision in which a single object appears double. Also called double vision.
[1805–15; (dipl (o)- + -opia)]
di•plop′ic (-ˈplɒp ɪk, -ˈploʊ pɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diplopia - visual impairment in which an object is seen as two objects; "diplopia often disappears when one eye is covered"
vision defect, visual defect, visual disorder, visual impairment - impairment of the sense of sight
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

di·plo·pi·a

n. diplopía, visión doble.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A previously healthy four-year-old girl was presented to our emergency room with complaints of binocular horizontal diplopia of sudden onset and strabismus.
A 48-year-old man presented at the ophthalmologic outpatient department with a 3-day mild horizontal diplopia in the left direction followed by the onset of headache 17 days later.
Bilateral ptosis and horizontal diplopia forced her to go to a general practitioner, who administered some medications to no avail.
All cases had chief complaint of horizontal diplopia. All cases of 6th nerve palsy had restriction of abduction movement due to lateral rectus palsy and all cases of 3rd nerve had restriction of adduction movement due to medial rectus palsy.
True CN III palsies can present with some or all of the following deficits: vertical and horizontal diplopia, ptosis, a down-and-out position of the affected eye, and mydriasis.