horizontal mobility

Related to horizontal mobility: intragenerational mobility, Social mobility

horizontal mobility

n
(Sociology) sociol the movement of groups or individuals to positions that differ from those previously held but do not involve any change in class, status, or power. Compare vertical mobility See also upward mobility, downward mobility
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Dependency syndrome among tenants restricts generational and horizontal mobility. Unfortunately, political system also patronizes the privileged ones.
Third, America unleashed a hitherto unknown degree of vertical and horizontal mobility among those who made it to her shores.
(5) With the exception of movements from classes 3 to 5 which are classified as horizontal mobility as they are difficult to rank hierarchically (see Goldthorpe, 2016, pp.
Transportation allows for horizontal mobility, making the physical movement of people and goods from point to point simpler and, more enduringly, it allows for vertical mobility, uplifting women's conditions by providing an avenue for them to strategically address their needs, Abaya said.
* Path A: Non-academic horizontal mobility, meaning additional vocational training in the dual or full-time vocational school segment followed an initial vocational training that was likewise non-academic, especially in another occupational field.
First, there is very little possibility for horizontal mobility between general academic education on the one hand and TVET on the other in the Indian educational system.
Of course, its horizontal mobility would be somewhat challenged, but if one wanted to go up and take a shot or two, or toss a few rocks, then get down again to re-arm in safety, this would be just the ticket.
Also, the vertical and horizontal mobility skills learned during the previous weeks will be necessary to complete all missions issued.
Most Chinese (with or without disabilities) began and ended their working lives in a unit (e.g., a factory, commune, hospital, or school) and horizontal mobility between work units was very rare (Liberman, 1994).
The results confirm the general tendency of an increasing horizontal mobility in the workforce at the expense of a declining promotional mobility (known for its high link with socio-professional promotion).
16.6 16.6 22.6 25.8 27.6 30.1 (a) 0.0 1.7 3.0 3.3 5.2 6.1 (b) 16.6 14.9 19.6 22.6 22.5 24.0 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 N 193 596 1229 1955 2304 741 - upward: upward mobility, - down.: downward mobility, - hor.: horizontal mobility, - lines marked (a) contain cases which exclude the farmers (IVc), - lines marked (b) contain cases in which the father and/or the son was a farmer.