hormonal


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hor·mone

 (hôr′mōn′)
n.
1.
a. A substance, usually a peptide or steroid, produced by one tissue and conveyed by the bloodstream to another to effect physiological activity, such as growth or metabolism.
b. A synthetic compound that acts like a hormone in the body.
2. Any of various similar substances found in plants and insects that regulate development.

[From Greek hormōn, present participle of hormān, to urge on, from hormē, impulse; see er- in Indo-European roots.]

hor·mon′al (-mō′nəl), hor·mon′ic (-mŏn′ĭk) adj.
hor·mon′al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hormonal - of or relating to or caused by hormones; "hormonal changes"
Translations
hormonální

hormonal

[hɔːˈməʊnəl] ADJhormonal

hormonal

[hɔːrˈməʊnəl] adjhormonal(e)

hormonal

hormonal

[hɔːˈməʊnl] adjormonale

hor·mo·nal

a. hormonal, rel. a una hormona o que actúa como tal.

hormonal

adj hormonal
References in periodicals archive ?
Temporary methods can either be hormonal or non-hormonal.
Missouri women who used hormonal birth control were 1.
Professor Malcolm Mason, pictured, director of the Wales Cancer Bank and the Cancer Research Wales laboratories, was awarded the William Farr Medal for work on a pivotal trial which examined the effects of adding radiotherapy to standard hormonal therapy when treating locally advanced prostate cancer.
Women living with HIV or at high risk for HIV can safely continue to use hormonal contraceptives to prevent pregnancy, according to the World Health Organization.
BALTIMORE - The use of hormonal contraception among women with epilepsy may significantly increase their rate of seizure activity, according to the findings of a Web-based survey of women aged 18-47 years with the neurological condition.
Use of hormonal contraceptives, especially the injectable, is associated with an increase in a woman's risk of acquiring HIV or of passing it on to her male partner, new research suggests.
Washington, Oct 31 (ANI): Newer forms of hormonal contraception hampers arousal, lubrication and orgasm despite its family planning benefits and convenience, according to new research.
Painful periods can often be a sign of some underlying hormonal imbalance, and herbs should be able to sort this out.
Many women think condoms undermine sexual pleasure, but those who use hormonal contraception and condoms report higher overall sexual satisfaction, according to data from the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University, Bloomington.
Hormonal contraceptive methods, among the most effective means of preventing pregnancy, have greatly improved the well-being of women and their families alike.
Neither hormonal contraceptive method was associated with risk of HIV acquisition overall, including among women with cervical or vaginal infections.