hormone replacement therapy


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hormone replacement therapy

n. Abbr. HRT
The administration of estrogen, usually in combination with a progestogen, to relieve the symptoms of menopause and reduce the risk of osteoporosis in women. Hormone replacement therapy has been associated with certain risks, such as an increased risk of breast cancer. Also called menopausal hormone therapy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hormone replacement therapy

n
(Medicine) a form of oestrogen treatment used to control menopausal symptoms and in the prevention of osteoporosis. Abbreviation: HRT
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hor′mone replace`ment ther`apy


n.
the administration of estrogen and progestin to alleviate symptoms of menopause and, in postmenopausal women, esp. to protect against cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Compare estrogen replacement therapy.Abbr.: HRT
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hormone replacement therapy - hormones (estrogen and progestin) are given to postmenopausal women; believed to protect them from heart disease and osteoporosis
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hormone replacement therapy

nHormonersatztherapie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hormone replacement therapy

nterapia ormonale (usata in menopausa)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
and Canadian adults may be driven by the sharp reduction in the use of hormone replacement therapy following the 2002 report from the Women's Health Initiative, Sheila N.
In a meta-analysis of 52 epidemiological studies that involved a total of nearly 21,500 women with ovarian cancer, women who had used hormone replacement therapy for just a few years were about 40 percent more likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who had never used such therapy.
In another study done on menopausal women aged 50 - Less than 60 years living in Alexandria, almost 40 Percent of the women in the study had prior knowledge about menopausal symptoms and 91 Percent had never heard about hormone replacement therapy. When asked about practices that might help them to overcome menopausal symptoms 61 Percent said taking vitamins and 55 Percent said exposure to sunlight.
Preventive Services Task Force does not necessarily apply to women who use hormone replacement therapy to reduce menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness, the LA Times reported.
Chen and his associates conducted telephone interviews with the patients to obtain detailed medical, social, family, and gynecologic histories, including information about lifetime use and duration of use of oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, as well as menstrual and reproductive history.
In 2002, the Women's Health Initiative revealed the risks of hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
Fall in hormone replacement therapy associated with fall in breast cancer.
To put the findings in perspective, they mean that over a period of five years there is likely to be one extra case of ovarian cancer among every 2,500 women receiving hormone replacement therapy.
Among the subjects addressed at this year's conference were new drug delivery systems for bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, the latest developments in antioxidant and vitamin therapies, breakthroughs in stem cell therapeutics and human cloning, advances in genetic engineering and genomics, and recent innovations in nanotechnology and nano-biology.
The incidence of breast cancer has dropped sharply, and the decline may be due to the fact that millions of older women have stopped using hormone replacement therapy. At the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December, M.
Elderly women who received progestin as part of hormone replacement therapy have poorer hearing than do women who didn't get progestin, a new study finds.
"The Miracle of Bio-Identical Hormones: A Revolutionary Approach to Wellness for Men, Women and Children" is a comprehensive presentation explaining how hormone replacement therapy can restore lost health in ailments such as diabetes, fibromyalgia, ADHD, menstrual problems, migraine headaches, asthma, sexual problems, urinary incontinence, fertility issues, and others.