Aesculus hippocastanum

(redirected from horse chestnut tree)
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Noun1.Aesculus hippocastanum - tree having palmate leaves and large clusters of white to red flowers followed by brown shiny inedible seedsAesculus hippocastanum - tree having palmate leaves and large clusters of white to red flowers followed by brown shiny inedible seeds
Aesculus, genus Aesculus - deciduous trees or some shrubs of North America; southeastern Europe; eastern Asia
sweet buckeye - a tall and often cultivated buckeye of the central United States
Ohio buckeye - a buckeye with scaly grey bark that is found in the central United States
bottlebrush buckeye, dwarf buckeye - a spreading shrub with pink flowers; found in southeastern United States
red buckeye - a shrub buckeye of southern United States
particolored buckeye - a buckeye marked by different colors or tints
angiospermous tree, flowering tree - any tree having seeds and ovules contained in the ovary
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References in periodicals archive ?
THOUSANDS of city nature lovers have signed a petition to stop a 300-year-old "beautiful" horse chestnut tree from being chopped down.
A large prominent horse chestnut tree within the grounds of the historic listed Anchorite Cell, alongside to the footpath from St John's, has decayed in both the main trunk and the majority of its branches.
We have a horse chestnut tree that begins losing its yellow-gold leaves in August.
Middlesbrough Mayor Dave Budd visited Albert Park to plant a commemorative horse chestnut tree near the Cenotaph entrance.
He adds: "There are very many virtuous people I can think of who can't walk at my age, so it's a matter of luck, isn't it?" Stopping at a horse chestnut tree the Queen discusses a "health and safety" bid to stop kids playing conkers, adding: "It seems to me quite harmless."
Youngsters playing conkers in the 1970s conkers are the seed of the horse chestnut tree which fall to the ground in autumn so, when you've made an eaten your delicious curry, why not head out for a walk to collect conkers and play one of the oldest games around (ask your dad and grandad if they used to play and the answer will undoubtedly be 'yes').
Youngsters playing conkers in the 1970s conkers are the seed of the horse chestnut tree which fall to the ground in autumn so, when you've made and eaten your delicious curry, why not head out for a walk to collect conkers and play one of the oldest games around (ask your dad and grandad if they used to play and the answer will undoubtedly be 'yes').
THEY CAME, THEY SAW, THEY CONKERED A golden horse chestnut tree in the grounds of Overtoun House at Milton, near Dumbarton.
In one case in Sussex, four youngsters were swooped upon by police after throwing sticks at a horse chestnut tree, and in another case in Cheshire an 11-year-old schoolboy was arrested on suspicion of a hate-crime after calling a classmate gay, the report said.
For example, the Bottlebrush Buckeye, Aesculus parviflora, is a native shrub form of the better known horse chestnut tree. Hardy, vigorous growing (perhaps more so than ideal), showy white flowers in July, drought tolerant and deer resistant, it grows equally well in sun or shade.
CONKERS were removed from a horse chestnut tree in the Midlands by health and safety officers - as the Government announced curbs on the killjoy officials.