horseless carriage

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horse·less carriage

 (hôrs′lĭs)
n.
An automobile, especially one of the late 1800s or early 1900s.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

horse′less car′riage

(ˈhɔrs lɪs)
n.
an automobile.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horseless carriage - an early term for an automobilehorseless carriage - an early term for an automobile; "when automobiles first replaced horse-drawn carriages they were called horseless carriages"
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
They were congregated round a vast inclosure; they were elevated on amphitheatrical wooden stands, and they were perched on the roofs of horseless carriages, drawn up in rows.
It had rained earlier in the week and Martin was obliged to be careful of the chuck-holes in the sticky, heavy gumbo soon to be the bane of pioneers venturing forth in what were to be known for a few short years as "horseless carriages."
The group faced three challenges: cooperatively marketing the Finger Lakes region; developing signage; and ensuring service stations were equipped to handle horseless carriages.
1896: The speed limit for horseless carriages was raised from 4mph (2mph in towns) to 14mph.
| 1896: The speed limit for "horseless carriages" was raised from 4mph (2mph in towns) to 14mph.
And, eventually, these autonomous systems could replace humans at the steering wheel, just as horseless carriages replaced the horses.
Moulton, founder of Auto-Owners Insurance, approached Phillips about selling automobile insurance in Flint, Michigan, to those who were purchasing the "horseless carriages." At the time, there were still many horse-drawn carriages that filled the streets of downtown Flint.
The industrial revolution has begun (although the British nobles have had magic-powered horseless carriages and lights for years).
No one, however, had thought of racing motor vehicles, mostly because it was almost impossible to find two running horseless carriages to compete against one another.
In 1893, one of America's first horseless carriages was taken for a short test drive in Springfield by Frank Duryea, who had designed the vehicle with his brother, Charles.
Cleaning up hazardous pollution in Orlando that dates back to horseless carriages may start within a year by tearing down at least one building, installing a circular wall underground and temporarily closing off West Robinson Street to dig up or treat soil and water within that wall.
It was not possible to adapt the tack used to connect horses to wagons for use in the new horseless carriages. Likewise, it was not possible to adapt the infrastructure of a national telephone carrier to the growing need for mobile communication connectivity.