horticulturist


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hor·ti·cul·ture

 (hôr′tĭ-kŭl′chər)
n.
1. The science or art of cultivating fruits, vegetables, flowers, or ornamental plants.
2. The cultivation of a garden.

[Latin hortus, garden; see gher- in Indo-European roots + (agri)culture.]

hor′ti·cul′tur·al adj.
hor′ti·cul′tur·al·ly adv.
hor′ti·cul′tur·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horticulturist - an expert in the science of cultivating plants (fruit or flowers or vegetables or ornamental plants)horticulturist - an expert in the science of cultivating plants (fruit or flowers or vegetables or ornamental plants)
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
gardener, nurseryman - someone who takes care of a garden
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

horticulturist

[ˌhɔːtɪˈkʌltʃərɪst] Nhorticultor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

horticulturist

nGärtner(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

horticulturist

[ˌhɔːtɪˈkʌltʃrɪst] norticoltore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Boxtel heard him give the order, and saw the sentry-box put up that very day; but he deemed himself lucky in not having been suspected, and, being more than ever incensed against the successful horticulturist, he resolved to bide his time.
But this year," continued the horticulturist, "I'll take care it shall not happen, even if I should be forced to sit by the whole night to watch when the strawberries are ripe." Monte Cristo had seen enough.
A well-known horticulturist relates that one entered an old drain pipe and followed it until it came to a break, where a section of the pipe had been removed to make way for a stone wall that had been built across its course.
He had built himself a country-seat within a few miles of his native town, and there spent such portions of his time as could be spared from public service in the display of every grace and virtue--as a newspaper phrased it, on the eve of an election--befitting the Christian, the good citizen, the horticulturist, and the gentleman.
Not that they talked loudly or laughed much, but they were both so very handsome, and it was such a breezy day, and their light dresses and dark curls appeared so free and joyous in their abandonment, and Emma was so fair, and Dolly so rosy, and Emma so delicately shaped, and Dolly so plump, and--in short, there are no flowers for any garden like such flowers, let horticulturists say what they may, and both house and garden seemed to know it, and to brighten up sensibly.
The same principles are followed by horticulturists; but the variations are here often more abrupt.
Near the western extremity, where Fort Moultrie stands, and where are some miserable frame buildings, tenanted, during summer, by the fugitives from Charleston dust and fever, may be found, indeed, the bristly palmetto; but the whole island, with the exception of this western point, and a line of hard, white beach on the seacoast, is covered with a dense undergrowth of the sweet myrtle, so much prized by the horticulturists of England.
Senior horticulturist Laura Davies said: "We have got some very early primroses, which are incredibly early this year.
Senior horticulturist Laura Davies said, 'We have got some very early primroses, which are incredibly early this year.
While talking with Mount Vernon horticulturist Dean Norton, Stewart took especial note of the tulip poplar, white ash, and magnolia trees on the property.
Tibbitts, a horticulturist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Today the National Park Service oversees hundreds of thousands of trees on federally owned land in DC, and the city maintains 113,000 street trees, says Bill Beck, a supervisory horticulturist in the District's tree and landscape division.