hostess


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host·ess

 (hō′stĭs)
n.
1. A woman who receives or entertains guests in a social or official capacity.
2. A woman who manages an inn or hotel.
3. A woman who is the emcee or interviewer on a radio or television program.
4. A woman who is employed to greet and assist patrons, as in a restaurant.
5. A woman who is employed to dance with customers in a dance hall or nightclub. See Usage Note at -ess.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hostess

(ˈhəʊstɪs)
n
1. a woman acting as host
2. a woman who receives and entertains patrons of a club, restaurant, etc
3. (Aeronautics) See air hostess
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

host•ess

(ˈhoʊ stɪs)
n.
1. a woman who entertains guests in her own home or elsewhere.
2. a woman employed in a restaurant or the like to seat patrons.
3. a woman who acts as emcee, moderator, or interviewer for a television or radio program; host.
4. a woman employed by an airline or other carrier to see that passengers are comfortable throughout a trip.
5. a woman who manages a resort or hotel or who directs its social activities.
v.t.
7. to be or serve as hostess to or at.
v.i.
8. to perform the duties or functions of a hostess.
[1250–1300; < Old French]
usage: See -ess.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hostess - a woman hosthostess - a woman host        
host - a person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there
2.hostess - a woman innkeeper
innkeeper, boniface, host - the owner or manager of an inn
3.hostess - a woman steward on an airplanehostess - a woman steward on an airplane  
flight attendant, steward - an attendant on an airplane
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
værtinde
gostiteljicastevardesa

hostess

[ˈhəʊstes] Nhuéspeda f, anfitriona f; (in night club) → azafata f (Aer) → azafata f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hostess

[ˈhəʊstəs] n
[guest] → hôtesse f
(= flight attendant) → hôtesse f de l'air
(in nightclub)entraîneuse fhostess trolley n (British)table f roulante chauffantehost family n [foreign student] → famille f d'accueil
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hostess

n
(person) → Gastgeberin f; (in own home) → Hausherrin f, → Gastgeberin f; to be or play hostess to somebodyjds Gastgeberin sein; (in own home also) → jdn zu Besuch or Gast haben
(in hotel etc) → Wirtin f
(in nightclub) → Hostess f
(= air hostess)Stewardess f; (at exhibition etc) → Hostess f
(on TV programme etc) → Gastgeberin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hostess

[ˈhəʊstɛs] nospite f (Aer) → hostess f inv; (in nightclub) → entraîneuse f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, the Willoughbys, Lord Rugby and his wife, our hostess, Geoffrey Clouston, the usual set.
On this accursed bed Don Quixote stretched himself, and the hostess and her daughter soon covered him with plasters from top to toe, while Maritornes- for that was the name of the Asturian- held the light for them, and while plastering him, the hostess, observing how full of wheals Don Quixote was in some places, remarked that this had more the look of blows than of a fall.
"Mind, Annette, I hope you have not played a wicked trick on me," she added, turning to her hostess. "You wrote that it was to be quite a small reception, and just see how badly I am dressed." And she spread out her arms to show her short-waisted, lace-trimmed, dainty gray dress, girdled with a broad ribbon just below the breast.
HOSTESS. Who's this that stands so solemnly by himself?
I was not ashamed of it at all; for, though plain, I had taken good care not to shabby or mean, and should have been pretty considerably at my ease, if my condescending hostess had not taken such manifest pains to make me so; and, as for the magnificence that surrounded her, nothing that met my eyes struck me or affected me half so much as her own altered appearance.
The jolliest person present, as well as the most important, was of course old Santa Claus; so he was given the seat of honor at one end of the table while at the other end sat Princess Ozma, the hostess.
Lady Anselman glanced around with the scrutinising air of the professional hostess, to see that her guests were properly seated before she devoted herself to the Cabinet Minister.
It was exactly the silence ensuing on the retreat of the servant and the closed door that marked between him and his hostess the degree of this ease.
When he entered the room alone, our host and hostess both started, and both looked surprised.
They strolled together after the other guests into the winter gardens, which were the envy of every hostess in London.
His early refinement of character was not only not lost, it grew even greater than ever; but it was now applied to the little, instead of to the great things of life -- to the martial condition of the soldier -- comprised under the head of a good lodging, a rich table, a congenial hostess. These important advantages D'Artagnan found to his own taste in the Rue Tiquetonne at the sign of the Roe.
Almost at the same instant the hostess, with freshly arranged coiffure and freshened face, walked in at one door and her guests at the other door of the drawing room, a large room with dark walls, downy rugs, and a brightly lighted table, gleaming with the light of candles, white cloth, silver samovar, and transparent china tea things.