hothousing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hot·house

 (hŏt′hous′)
n.
1. A heated greenhouse for plants that require an even, relatively warm temperature.
2. An environment conducive to vigorous growth or development; a hotbed: "With its mix of African, Latin, European, and pan-American influences, the Caribbean is truly a musical hothouse" (New Yorker).
adj.
1. Grown in a hothouse: a hothouse orchid.
2. Delicate and sensitive, as if from being grown in a hothouse.
tr.v. hot·housed, hot·hous·ing, hot·hous·es
To cultivate in a hothouse.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hothousing

(ˈhɒthaʊzɪŋ)
n
the practice of teaching children to high level at an earlier than usual agethe practice of providing intense, special training to young people who are good at sport, particularly football
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"Some do not respond well to hothousing, some are late developers.
Our innovation hothousing techniques helped us come up with new ways to support kids understand the commercial realities of the internet and navigate the digital world with confidence, answering questions like how companies and YouTube stars make money online, why gaming is addictive and why they find it difficult to put their devices down.
"I think this is fairly unique in the world but I'm sure some of the companies working with us this week are to going to make it happen elsewhere because they've seen the value of hothousing collaboration in this way."
Clearly, Adonis rails against the hothousing that would bring him to a state of eternal summer--a perpetual sexual ripeness, if you will--where Venus would eternally possess and preserve him.
One of this year[s chosen Horizsons project acts - the BBC Wales and Arts Council of Wales' music industry hothousing scheme - they're destined for bigger stages in every sense, not least because they've been playing some of the UK's largest music festivals this summer.
Parents and teachers have warned of a "hothousing" culture with a relentless focus on grammar and maths.
(1998) suggested that the teaching methods used by the Chinese American parents corresponded closely with those described by Sigel (1987) as "hothousing"--a process of inducing infants to acquire knowledge that is typically acquired at a later point in developmental time.