hothousing


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hot·house

 (hŏt′hous′)
n.
1. A heated greenhouse for plants that require an even, relatively warm temperature.
2. An environment conducive to vigorous growth or development; a hotbed: "With its mix of African, Latin, European, and pan-American influences, the Caribbean is truly a musical hothouse" (New Yorker).
adj.
1. Grown in a hothouse: a hothouse orchid.
2. Delicate and sensitive, as if from being grown in a hothouse.
tr.v. hot·housed, hot·hous·ing, hot·hous·es
To cultivate in a hothouse.

hothousing

(ˈhɒthaʊzɪŋ)
n
the practice of teaching children to high level at an earlier than usual agethe practice of providing intense, special training to young people who are good at sport, particularly football
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References in periodicals archive ?
I think this is fairly unique in the world but I'm sure some of the companies working with us this week are to going to make it happen elsewhere because they've seen the value of hothousing collaboration in this way.
One of this year[s chosen Horizsons project acts - the BBC Wales and Arts Council of Wales' music industry hothousing scheme - they're destined for bigger stages in every sense, not least because they've been playing some of the UK's largest music festivals this summer.
and in the pursuit of academic hothousing (homework, exams, and tutoring in the middle-class case).
Las herramientas de la ingenieria genotica pueden ser novedosas, pero a este respecto se asemejan a las dietas experimentales con adiciones vitaminicas o la ensenanza mediante hothousing.
These fantastic results are not achieved by hothousing or cramming.