hotting

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hot

 (hŏt)
adj. hot·ter, hot·test
1.
a. Having or giving off heat; capable of burning.
b. Being at a high temperature.
2. Being at or exhibiting a temperature that is higher than normal or desirable: a hot forehead.
3. Causing a burning sensation, as in the mouth; spicy: hot peppers; a hot curry.
4.
a. Charged or energized with electricity: a hot wire.
b. Radioactive or designed to use radioactive materials.
5.
a. Marked by intensity of emotion; ardent or fiery: a hot temper.
b. Having or displaying great enthusiasm; eager: hot for travel.
6.
a. Informal Arousing intense interest, excitement, or controversy: a hot new book; a hot topic.
b. Informal Marked by excited activity or energy: a hot week on the stock market.
c. Violent; raging: a hot battle.
7. Slang
a. Sexually attractive.
b. Sexually attracted; full of desire: In this week's show, the surgeon is really hot for the new intern.
c. Sexually aroused.
8. Slang
a. Recently stolen: a hot car.
b. Wanted by the police: a hot suspect.
9. Close to a successful solution or conclusion: hot on the trail.
10. Informal
a. Most recent; new or fresh: a hot news item; the hot fashions for fall.
b. Currently very popular or successful: one of the hottest young talents around.
c. Requiring immediate action or attention: a hot opportunity.
11. Slang Very good or impressive. Often used in the negative: I'm not so hot at math.
12. Slang Funny or absurd: told a hot one about the neighbors' dog.
13. Slang
a. Performing with great skill and daring: a hot drummer.
b. Having or characterized by repeated successes: a player who is on a hot streak.
c. Fast and responsive: a hot sports car.
d. Unusually lucky: hot at craps.
14. Music Of, relating to, or being an emotionally charged style of performance marked by strong rhythms and improvisation: hot jazz.
15. Bold and bright.
adv.
1. In a hot manner; hotly.
2. While hot: foods that are best eaten hot.
tr.v. hot·ted, hot·ting, hots
Informal To cause to increase in intensity or excitement. Often used with up: "His book is an exercise in the fashionable art of instant history, in which every episode is hotted up with an anecdote" (Harper's).
Idioms:
hot and bothered Informal
In a state of agitated excitement; flustered: all hot and bothered before the opening performance.
hot and heavy
1. Informal Passionate or intense: Interest in the new stock was hot and heavy.
2. Characterized by or engaging in amorous or sexual activity.
hot to trot Slang
1. Sexually avid; lascivious.
2. Ready and willing; eager.
hot under the collar Informal
Angry.
make it hot for Slang
To make things uncomfortable or dangerous for: Don't make it hot for yourself by needlessly finding fault.

[Middle English, from Old English hāt; see kai- in Indo-European roots.]

hot′ness n.

hotting

(ˈhɒtɪŋ)
n
(Automotive Engineering) informal the practice of stealing fast cars and putting on a show of skilful but dangerous driving
ˈhotter n
References in classic literature ?
The summer weeks dragged by, and then the political campaign opened-- opened in pretty warm fashion, and waxed hotter and hotter daily.
The coming in here from the bedroom, with my pen and ink and paper, before sunrise--the sitting down at the widely- opened window to get all the air I could to cool me--the ceaseless writing, faster and faster, hotter and hotter, driving on more and more wakefully, all through the dreadful interval before the house was astir again--how clearly I recall it, from the beginning by candle-light, to the end on the page before this, in the sunshine of the new day!
Meantime, it was getting hotter and hotter in there.
"I could work faster," he explained, "if your irons were only hotter."
The men were working so hard in the wheatfields that they did not notice the heat--though I was kept busy carrying water for them--and grandmother and Antonia had so much to do in the kitchen that they could not have told whether one day was hotter than another.
A more complete imagination than Philip's might have pictured a youth of splendid hope, for he must have been entering upon manhood in 1848 when kings, remembering their brother of France, went about with an uneasy crick in their necks; and perhaps that passion for liberty which passed through Europe, sweeping before it what of absolutism and tyranny had reared its head during the reaction from the revolution of 1789, filled no breast with a hotter fire.
de Chagny and I had repeatedly taken off our coats and put them on again, finding at one time that they made us feel still hotter and at another that they protected us against the heat.
With a last desperate effort, her heart beating faster and faster, the blood burning hotter and hotter in her cheeks, Mercy still controlled herself.
An' Billy listens in that slow, sleepy way of his, an' Butch gets hotter an' hotter, an' everybody expects a scrap.
He was also hotter than at first, and breathed harder.
Besides, there seemeth not much added to their fortune; and envy is as the sunbeams, that beat hotter upon a bank, or steep rising ground, than upon a flat.
The further we went the hotter the sun got, and the more rocky and bare, repulsive and dreary the landscape became.