houngan


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houngan

(ˈhuːŋɡən; ˈuːŋɡən) or

hungan

n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) a voodoo priest
[C20: from Haitian Creole, from Fon hun deity + ga chief]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

houngan

Also known as a voodoo priest, papa or papa-loa, in the vodoun religion this is a man who summons vodoun gods in order to divine the future or heal. A houngan involved in black magic is known as a “bakor” or “boko.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned, the zombie stories find its origins in Haitian popular culture in which a sorcerer, a bokor or houngan, summons the dead out of their graves forcing them into slave labor.
In another example, the Houngan, a priest-like individual who attempts to conduct the dialogue between the living and the dead, is described as "a short, black man, narrow around the waist, almost fragile in the spareness of his arms" (31).
He understands Charlie Parker in the cosmic sense--as stated by Ishmael Reed in his novel Mumbo Jumbo (1972)--"the houngan ...
Sometimes, the houngan can ritually separate the ti bon ange from the flesh and sent it to live in the so-called "dark waters" for a year and a day; then the family can ritually raise the soul--now called esprit (i.
In order to open a portal into the past, Genna borrows from the library a book of hoodoo spells before seeking the help of her Haitian friend, whose uncle is a houngan, a Vodou priest.
Many had a houngan, or "voodoo physician," of one chickenscratch school or another.
Thereafter, the houngan, or voodoo priests, were often referred to as 'makandals'; to possess certain powers or simply to practice voodoo was to be a 'makandal' ...
Some women from each group said they would eventually consult a Voodoo priest (houngan) or clergy for spiritual care during an illness, especially if Western medicine did not yield the desired outcome quickly.
The author instead cites the speech delivered by the Vodun houngan Boukman in August 1791--or, to be more specific, James's translation of it (37n42).
themselves welcomed and valorized in Vodou temples by lwa and houngan