house wren


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Related to house wren: winter wren

house wren

n.
A small brown wren (Troglodytes aedon) found throughout the Americas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.house wren - common American wren that nests around houseshouse wren - common American wren that nests around houses
jenny wren, wren - any of several small active brown birds of the northern hemisphere with short upright tails; they feed on insects
genus Troglodytes, Troglodytes - type genus of the Troglodytidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Among them are mallard, great blue heron, rock pigeon, hummingbirds, woodpeckers, peregrine falcon, blue jay, American crow, tree and barn swallows, house wren, bluebirds and robins, cedar waxwing, tanagers, northern cardinal and American goldfinch.
We provided house wren nest boxes and birdhouse gourds during the breeding seasons of 2000, 2001, 2009, and 2010.
Nest boxes should be placed in open fields - not under trees - to avoid house wren occupation.
In spring, it may even house wren or blackbird nests, as well as a host of hibernating creatures, including butterflies.
The most common species detected were house wren (Troglodytes aedon: n = 52), Bewick's wren (Thryomanes bewickii: n = 17), and wood duck (Aix sponsa: n = 10).
House Wren: Regular backyard visitors, house wrens have diets that consist almost exclusively of insects and spiders.
Red-Winged Blackbird Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Scarlet Tanager Purple Martin House Wren Indigo Bunting Cedar Waxwing Bluebird Bald Eagle Brown Pelican Turkey Herring Gull Mallard Duck Common Loon Canada Goose Great Blue Heron Red-Tailed Hawk Common Barn Owl Ring-Necked Pheasant Northern Bobwhite
Prior to this study, a review of field reports of heavy mite infestations of nests on our study area (see Methods and Results) suggested that mites in House Wren nests on our site had the potential to affect nestling condition adversely.
The best bug-eaters are the bushtit and the house wren, he said.
We found that local bird species most frequently infested by ticks include the low-foraging grouse, turkey, chickadee, house wren, gray catbird, brown thrasher, robin, wood thrush, hermit thrush, Swainson's thrush, veery, yellow warbler, ovenbird, northern waterthrush, Connecticut warbler, mourning warbler, common yellowthroat, goldfinch, rufous-sided towhee, field sparrow, white-throated sparrow, swamp sparrow and song sparrow.
Here we report a natural heterospecific cross-fostering experiment, which resulted from the usurpation of a House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) nest, with two recently laid eggs, by a pair of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolar).
but seven (Turkey Vulture, House Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Gray Catbird, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Common Yellowthroat).