housekeeper

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house·keep·er

 (hous′kē′pər)
n.
1. One who is employed to perform or direct the domestic tasks in a household.
2. A housewife or househusband.
3. An employee of an establishment, such as a hospital, inn, or hotel, who performs or coordinates housekeeping tasks.

housekeeper

(ˈhaʊsˌkiːpə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person, esp a woman, employed to run a household
2. bad housekeeper a person who is not an efficient and thrifty domestic manager
3. good housekeeper a person who is an efficient and thrifty domestic manager

house•keep•er

(ˈhaʊsˌki pər)

n.
1. a person, often hired, who does or directs the domestic work and planning necessary for a home, as housecleaning or buying food.
2. an employee of a hotel, hospital, etc., who supervises the cleaning staff.
[1375–1425]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.housekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a householdhousekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a household
domestic, domestic help, house servant - a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
Translations
مُدَبِّرَة شؤون البيْت
domovník-ice
husholderske
házvezetõ
ráîskona
hišnicahišnik

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] Nama f de llaves; (in hotel) → gobernanta f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊskiːpər] ngouvernante f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] ngovernante f

house

(haus) plural houses (ˈhauziz) noun
1. a building in which people, especially a single family, live. Houses have been built on the outskirts of the town for the workers in the new industrial estate.
2. a place or building used for a particular purpose. a hen-house; a public house.
3. a theatre, or the audience in a theatre. There was a full house for the first night of the play.
4. a family, usually important or noble, including its ancestors and descendants. the house of David.
(hauz) verb
1. to provide with a house, accommodation or shelter. All these people will have to be housed; The animals are housed in the barn.
2. to store or keep somewhere. The electric generator is housed in the garage.
ˈhousing (-ziŋ) noun
1. houses. These flats will provide housing for the immigrants.
2. the hard cover round a machine etc.
ˈhousing benefit noun
a payment given by a government to people who are entitled to it according to certain criteria (eg poverty) when they buy or rent a house, an apartment etc.
house agent (American ˈreal-estate agent)
a person who arranges the sale or letting of houses.
house arrest
a type of arrest in which a person is not allowed to leave his own house. He was kept under house arrest.
ˈhouseboat noun
a type of boat, usually with a flat bottom, which is built to be lived in.
ˈhousebreaker noun
a person who breaks into a house in order to steal.
ˈhousebreaking noun
ˈhouse-fly noun
the common fly, found throughout the world.
ˈhousehold noun
the people who live together in a house, including their servants. How many people are there in this household?
ˈhouseholder noun
the person who owns a house or pays the rent for it.
household word
something which is well-known to everyone. His name is a household word throughout the country.
ˈhousekeeper noun
a person, usually a woman, who is paid to look after the management of a house.
ˈhousekeeping noun
the management of a house.
ˈhouseman noun
a recently qualified doctor who is living in a hospital while working there to complete his training.
ˈhousetrain verb
to train (a dog, cat etc) to be clean inside the house.
ˈhouse-warming noun
a party given after moving into a new house.
adjective
a house-warming party.
ˈhousewife nounplural ˈhousewives
a woman who looks after her house, her husband and her family, and who usually does not have a job outside the home.
ˈhousework noun
the work of keeping a house clean and tidy. My mother has a woman to help her with the housework.
like a house on fire
1. very well. The two children got on with each other like a house on fire.
2. very quickly. I'm getting through this job like a house on fire.
References in classic literature ?
They all went in, the housekeeper with them, and found more than a hundred volumes of big books very well bound, and some other small ones.
The simplicity of the housekeeper made the licentiate laugh, and he directed the barber to give him the books one by one to see what they were about, as there might be some to be found among them that did not deserve the penalty of fire.
I have seen nobody but the man-servant who opened the door to me, and the housekeeper, a very civil person, who showed me the way to my own room, and got me my tea.
The housekeeper said, "I am quite of your opinion, miss," and appeared to think me the most sensible woman she had met with for a long time past.
They found Sir Jervis's housekeeper luxuriously recumbent in the easiest chair in the room.
The housekeeper listened to the praise of her domestic virtues with eyes immovably fixed on her elegant chemisette.
With an expressive little cough, and with one steady look at her master, the housekeeper conceded the point, and took her seat against the right-hand door-post.
Rouncewell, the old housekeeper at Chesney Wold, has several times taken off her spectacles and cleaned them to make certain that the drops were not upon the glasses.
in quick reply to a gesture of dissent from the housekeeper.
I was looking at the two, when there came between me and them, the housekeeper, with the first dish for the table.
Strictly methodical in all his habits, Benjamin had telegraphed to his housekeeper, from Edinburgh, to have supper ready or us by ten o'clock, and to send the cabman whom he always employed to meet us at the station.
On applying to see the place, they were admitted into the hall; and Elizabeth, as they waited for the housekeeper, had leisure to wonder at her being where she was.