housekeeper

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house·keep·er

 (hous′kē′pər)
n.
1. One who is employed to perform or direct the domestic tasks in a household.
2. A housewife or househusband.
3. An employee of an establishment, such as a hospital, inn, or hotel, who performs or coordinates housekeeping tasks.

housekeeper

(ˈhaʊsˌkiːpə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person, esp a woman, employed to run a household
2. bad housekeeper a person who is not an efficient and thrifty domestic manager
3. good housekeeper a person who is an efficient and thrifty domestic manager

house•keep•er

(ˈhaʊsˌki pər)

n.
1. a person, often hired, who does or directs the domestic work and planning necessary for a home, as housecleaning or buying food.
2. an employee of a hotel, hospital, etc., who supervises the cleaning staff.
[1375–1425]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.housekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a householdhousekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a household
domestic, domestic help, house servant - a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
Translations
مُدَبِّرَة شؤون البيْت
domovník-ice
husholderske
házvezetõ
ráîskona
hišnicahišnik

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] Nama f de llaves; (in hotel) → gobernanta f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊskiːpər] ngouvernante f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] ngovernante f

house

(haus) plural houses (ˈhauziz) noun
1. a building in which people, especially a single family, live. Houses have been built on the outskirts of the town for the workers in the new industrial estate.
2. a place or building used for a particular purpose. a hen-house; a public house.
3. a theatre, or the audience in a theatre. There was a full house for the first night of the play.
4. a family, usually important or noble, including its ancestors and descendants. the house of David.
(hauz) verb
1. to provide with a house, accommodation or shelter. All these people will have to be housed; The animals are housed in the barn.
2. to store or keep somewhere. The electric generator is housed in the garage.
ˈhousing (-ziŋ) noun
1. houses. These flats will provide housing for the immigrants.
2. the hard cover round a machine etc.
ˈhousing benefit noun
a payment given by a government to people who are entitled to it according to certain criteria (eg poverty) when they buy or rent a house, an apartment etc.
house agent (American ˈreal-estate agent)
a person who arranges the sale or letting of houses.
house arrest
a type of arrest in which a person is not allowed to leave his own house. He was kept under house arrest.
ˈhouseboat noun
a type of boat, usually with a flat bottom, which is built to be lived in.
ˈhousebreaker noun
a person who breaks into a house in order to steal.
ˈhousebreaking noun
ˈhouse-fly noun
the common fly, found throughout the world.
ˈhousehold noun
the people who live together in a house, including their servants. How many people are there in this household?
ˈhouseholder noun
the person who owns a house or pays the rent for it.
household word
something which is well-known to everyone. His name is a household word throughout the country.
ˈhousekeeper noun
a person, usually a woman, who is paid to look after the management of a house.
ˈhousekeeping noun
the management of a house.
ˈhouseman noun
a recently qualified doctor who is living in a hospital while working there to complete his training.
ˈhousetrain verb
to train (a dog, cat etc) to be clean inside the house.
ˈhouse-warming noun
a party given after moving into a new house.
adjective
a house-warming party.
ˈhousewife nounplural ˈhousewives
a woman who looks after her house, her husband and her family, and who usually does not have a job outside the home.
ˈhousework noun
the work of keeping a house clean and tidy. My mother has a woman to help her with the housework.
like a house on fire
1. very well. The two children got on with each other like a house on fire.
2. very quickly. I'm getting through this job like a house on fire.
References in classic literature ?
The three Marys were considered as dangerous as high explosives to have about the kitchen, yet they were such good cooks and such admirable housekeepers that they never had to look for a place.
When not more profitably employed, the sperm whale hunters sometimes capture the Hyena whale, to keep up the supply of cheap oil for domestic employment --as some frugal housekeepers, in the absence of company, and quite alone by themselves, burn unsavory tallow instead of odorous wax.
I'm very glad to hear it,' said Scrooge's nephew,`because I haven't great faith in these young housekeepers.
It was a small bit of pork suspended from the kettle-hanger by a string passed through a large door-key, in a way known to primitive housekeepers unpossessed of jacks.
Many young couples of my acquaintance, who have had no other reason for concealing the fact beyond their own whim, have thus slipped off without saying a word to anybody, and returned full-blown housekeepers, with "at home" days of their own, and everything else like real married people,--for, as said an old lady to me, "one can never be sure of married people nowadays unless you have been at the wedding.
Pocket- handkerchiefs and housekeepers are our themes, and not pretty women.
I had no doubt but that they regarded children as odious incumbrances; and their ideas of domestic felicity were sufficiently shown in the fact, that they allowed no meddlesome housekeepers to turn topsy-turvy those snug little arrangements they had made in their comfortable dwelling.
Next the music was to be provided; drawers were emptied; the shop-keepers did a glorious trade in wax, ribbons, and sword-knots; housekeepers laid in stores of bread, meat, and spices.
And there, as they slowly paced the gradual ascent, heedless of every group around them, seeing neither sauntering politicians, bustling housekeepers, flirting girls, nor nursery-maids and children, they could indulge in those retrospections and acknowledgements, and especially in those explanations of what had directly preceded the present moment, which were so poignant and so ceaseless in interest.
Suppose it is rather fussy and provoking, like all good housekeepers, --it can at any moment render an account of its disbursements.
Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting "cotton warp" quilts--she had knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices--and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond.
And now, there he sat, with the remains of a beard at least a week old encumbering his chin; a soiled and crumpled shirt-frill crouching, as it were, upon his breast, instead of standing boldly out; a demeanour so abashed and drooping, so despondent, and expressive of such humiliation, grief, and shame; that if the souls of forty unsubstantial housekeepers, all of whom had had their water cut off for non-payment of the rate, could have been concentrated in one body, that one body could hardly have expressed such mortification and defeat as were now expressed in the person of Mr Lillyvick the collector.