hugeness


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huge

 (hyo͞oj)
adj. hug·er, hug·est
1. Of exceedingly great size, extent, or quantity. See Synonyms at enormous.
2. Of exceedingly great scope or nature: the huge influence of the Hellenic world.
3. Informal Contributing in a major way to success; very important: The defensive line was huge in the second half.

[Middle English, from Old French ahuge.]

huge′ly adv.
huge′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

hugeness

noun
Translations
ضَخامَه
obrovitost
hatalmas volta
magn; bÿsn
obrovskosť
çok büyüklükirilik

hugeness

[ˈhjuːdʒnɪs] Ninmensidad f

hugeness

huge

(hjuːdʒ) adjective
very large. a huge dog; a huge sum of money; Their new house is huge.
ˈhugeness noun
ˈhugely adverb
very much; greatly.
References in classic literature ?
"He is dead, dear Mother; for just now a very huge beast with four great feet came to the pool and crushed him to death with his cloven heel." The Frog, puffing herself out, inquired, "if the beast was as big as that in size." "Cease, Mother, to puff yourself out," said her son, "and do not be angry; for you would, I assure you, sooner burst than successfully imitate the hugeness of that monster."
"And that means the end of your teaming contract." Saxon saw the disaster in all its hugeness. "What about the brickyard people?"
Man after man came against him, but no man put his hand down, even Olaf Henderson and French Louis failing despite their hugeness. When they contended it was a trick, a trained muscular knack, he challenged them to another test.
The whips fell on the horses, and the horses struggled in all their hugeness and might to pull away from the pain of the punishment.
But his hugeness could not quite overcome his apprehensiveness.
To those who have not chanced specially to study the subject, it may possibly seem strange, that fishes not commonly exceeding four or five feet should be marshalled among WHALES --a word, which, in the popular sense, always conveys an idea of hugeness. But the creatures set down above as Duodecimoes are infallibly whales, by the terms of my definition of what a whale is --i.
But what makes the scenes even more bizarre is the hugeness of the objects and the grandness of the space in comparison to the miniature figures.
When I think of [ldots] I mentioned, you know, Pound's "Song in Pisa" and I mentioned cummings' poem "i sing of olaf glad and big." And if I think of cummings, I might think of three or four or five poems; I always think of that poem, rightly or wrongly, its passion, anger, bitterness, hugeness, anarchy, its desperate s earch for justice, and these things I talk about are ideas of meaning rather than rhythm.
Arabella Weir, a star of BBC2's The Fast Show, spent much of her adult life obsessed by the perceived hugeness of her backside.
The hugeness of the subject, which includes history and geography over much of the world, is evident in the 517 pages of this book.
One of the men might have come up to her and made a joke--"Look, he's not as quick as he used to be!"--and then she would have laughed edgily and looked at Matt Romano splashing through the sea until some presentiment of the hugeness of her risk made her shiver.
The background is hugeness and confusion shading away from