humanism

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hu·man·ism

 (hyo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A system of thought that focuses on humans and their values, capacities, and worth.
b. Humanism A cultural and intellectual movement of the Renaissance that emphasized human potential to attain excellence and promoted direct study of the literature, art, and civilization of classical Greece and Rome.
c. The study of the humanities; learning in the liberal arts.
d. Secular humanism.
2. Concern with the interests, needs, and welfare of humans: "the newest flower on the vine of corporate humanism" (Savvy).

humanism

(ˈhjuːməˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the denial of any power or moral value superior to that of humanity; the rejection of religion in favour of a belief in the advancement of humanity by its own efforts
2. (Philosophy) a philosophical position that stresses the autonomy of human reason in contradistinction to the authority of the Church
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) (often capital) a cultural movement of the Renaissance, based on classical studies
4. interest in the welfare of people
ˈhumanist n
ˌhumanˈistic adj
ˌhumanˈistically adv

hu•man•ism

(ˈhyu məˌnɪz əm; often ˈyu-)

n.
1. (often cap.) any system of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity predominate, esp. an ethical theory that often rejects the importance of a belief in God.
2. devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. (sometimes cap.) the studies, principles, or culture of the Renaissance humanists.
[1805–15]

humanism

1. any system or mode of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity are taken to be of primary importance, as in moral judgments.
2. a devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. a theory of the life of man as a responsible being behaving independently of a revelation or deity. Also called naturalistic, scientific, or philosophical humanism. — humanist, n. — humanistic, adj.
See also: Mankind

humanism

A view originating in the Renaissance that reason must be autonomous from authorities such as the Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humanism - the doctrine that people's duty is to promote human welfare
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.humanism - the doctrine emphasizing a person's capacity for self-realization through reason; rejects religion and the supernatural
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
3.humanism - the cultural movement of the Renaissance; based on classical studies
cultural movement - a group of people working together to advance certain cultural goals
Translations
humanismushumanizmus
humanizam
humanisme

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] Nhumanismo m

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] nhumanisme m

humanism

nHumanismus m

humanism

[ˈhjuːməˌnɪzm] numanesimo
References in periodicals archive ?
Or to go all-out to try to live, if you can, humanistically, non-invidiously, valuing house above all, simply and wholly as home?
So what you have, then, is pretty much a solipsistic kind of world where you get your soul in harmony with the masterpieces, but, as Pater puts it, there is this wall around the individual through which hardly any communication breaks, so you always want to be present where voices converge, but they really converge not individualistically/ humanistically, but really solipsistically for you, you see, for you to burn with a hard and gemlike flame that constitutes success in life.
As Beyond the Barricades: The Sixties Generation Grows Up, by Jack Whalen and Richard Flacks, shows (along with other books on the New Left) many former New Leftists continued in the 1970s and 1980s to work in grass-roots organizations and to live in ways they considered ecologically and humanistically sound.
It was designed as a versatile and humanistically oriented assessment framework for case conceptualization.
The held of Law and Literature in the United States was initiated in the 1970s and 1980s by humanistically oriented law professors who adapted the techniques of literary criticism--for instance, hermeneutics and narratology--in an effort to help their students grasp legal texts and courtroom practice.
As I view it, there are three main problems with a humanistically deprived (cognitive-behaviourally informed) positive psychology: 1) methodological narrowness; 2) neglect of the tragic dimension; and 3) susceptibility to the expedient; and all three bode dubiously for our society.
Mathematically challenged readers of this journal should not be put off, however; a little empirical analysis is good for the souls of even the most humanistically inclined.
3) Systemic homologies, for example, between English and Italian early modern comedy, did not just magically appear; their genealogy can be explained, if not positively identified, by one of at least two causes: the precedence and prestige of Italian theater as an exfoliating "influence," and the general dissemination of humanism and humanistically inspired theater throughout the continent.
For example, in Italy, humanistically trained professors of medicine sometimes sneered at medieval medical texts and revered the ancient texts of Galen.
One basic conclusion is that there is still a rather wide gulf between humanistically oriented social scientists and physical scientists, with the degree of quantification being a major issue.
You have to be something less than humanistically inclined to regard that as a "crisis.
I also believe that it is important that humanistic counselors possess a clear (yet flexible) understanding of the values and attributes that we ascribe to as humanistically inclined helping professionals.

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