humanity


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hu·man·i·ty

 (hyo͞o-măn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. hu·man·i·ties
1. Humans considered as a group; the human race.
2. The condition or quality of being human.
3. The quality of being humane; benevolence.
4. A humane characteristic, attribute, or act.
5. humanities
a. The languages and literatures of ancient Greece and Rome; the classics.
b. Those branches of knowledge, such as philosophy, literature, and art, that are concerned with human thought and culture.

[Middle English humanite, from Old French, from Latin hūmānitās, from hūmānus, human; see human.]

humanity

(hjuːˈmænɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the human race
2. the quality of being human
3. kindness or mercy
4. (Philosophy) the humanities (plural) the study of literature, philosophy, and the arts
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the study of Ancient Greek and Roman language, literature, etc

hu•man•i•ty

(hyuˈmæn ɪ ti; often yu-)

n., pl. -ties.
1. all human beings collectively; the human race; humankind.
2. the quality or condition of being human; human nature.
3. the quality of being humane; kindness; benevolence; goodwill.
4. the humanities,
a. literature, languages, philosophy, art, etc., or their study: distinguished from the sciences.
b. classical languages and classical literature, esp. as a field of study.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin hūmānitās. See human, -ity]

Humanity

 human beings collectively, 1579.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humanity - the quality of being humane
humaneness - the quality of compassion or consideration for others (people or animals)
2.humanity - the quality of being human; "he feared the speedy decline of all manhood"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
3.humanity - all of the living human inhabitants of the earthhumanity - all of the living human inhabitants of the earth; "all the world loves a lover"; "she always used `humankind' because `mankind' seemed to slight the women"
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
human, human being, homo, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"

humanity

noun
1. the human race, man, mankind, people, men, mortals, humankind, Homo sapiens They face charges of committing crimes against humanity.
2. human nature, mortality, humanness It made him feel deprived of his humanity.
plural noun
1. arts, liberal arts, classics, classical studies, literae humaniores The number of students majoring in the humanities has declined.
Quotations
"Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing can ever be made" [Immanuel Kant Idee zu einer allgemeinen Geschichte in welt bürgerlicher Absicht]
"We're all of us guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is just a work in progress" [Tennessee Williams Camino Real]

humanity

noun
Translations
إنسانِيَّه، لَطافَه، شَفَقَهالبَشَرِيَّه
lidstvohumanita
menneskehedmenneskelighedvenlighed
humanitéscience humaine
emberségesség
mannkynmannúî
žmonijažmoniškumas
cilvēcecilvēcīgumshumānums
benevolenţăbunătateumanitate
humanita
človeštvo

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪtɪ] N
1. (gen) → humanidad f
crimes against humanitycrímenes mpl contra la humanidad or de lesa humanidad
2. (Literat, Art) the humanitieslas humanidades
3. (Scol) humanitiesletras fpl, humanidades fpl

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪti]
nhumanité f humanities
npl (history, philosophy, literature)humanités fpl

humanity

n
(= mankind)die Menschheit
(= human nature)Menschlichkeit f, → Menschenhaftigkeit f
(= humaneness)Humanität f, → Menschlichkeit f; to treat somebody with humanityjdn human behandeln
humanities plGeisteswissenschaften pl; (= Latin and Greek)Altphilologie f

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪtɪ] numanità
the humanities → gli studi letterari or umanistici, le lettere

humanity

(hjuˈmӕnəti) noun
1. kindness. a man of great humanity.
2. people in general. all humanity.

see also humane.

humanity

n. humanidad.
References in classic literature ?
But the mysterious forces that move humanity (mysterious because the laws of their motion are unknown to us) continued to operate.
Do you mean to say," cried Gania, from the other corner, "do you mean to say that railways are accursed inventions, that they are a source of ruin to humanity, a poison poured upon the earth to corrupt the springs of life?
But pray tell me, my brethren, if the goal of humanity be still lacking, is there not also still lacking--humanity itself?
It was the cry of the prophet who already hears emancipated humanity roaring and swarming; who beholds in the future, intelligence sapping faith, opinion dethroning belief, the world shaking off Rome.
In brief, I lost my fine faiths in pretty well everything except humanity, and the humanity I retained faith in was a very stark humanity indeed.
Violent death ever stalked in their midst; bomb and knife and bullet were looked upon as so many fangs of the roaring abysmal beast they must dominate if humanity were to persist.
May he continue to "grow in grace, and in the knowledge of God," that he may be increasingly serviceable in the cause of bleeding humanity, whether at home or abroad!
above all, For the resurrection of deep-buried faith In Truth -- in Virtue -- in Humanity -- Of all who, on Despair's unhallowed bed Lying down to die, have suddenly arisen At thy soft-murmured words, "Let there be light
Her appearance is changed greatly, her character much more so; and the person who is compelled, of necessity, to be her companion, will only sustain his affection hereafter by the remembrance of what she once was, by common humanity, and a sense of duty
A genial centenarian, whose years have told happily on him, he appreciates not only those humanities of feeling and habit which were peculiar to the last century and passed away with it, but also that permanent humanity which has but undergone a change of surface in the new world of our own, wholly different though it may look.
There is no wilderness where I can hide from these things, there is no haven where I can escape them; though I travel to the ends of the earth, I find the same accursed system--I find that all the fair and noble impulses of humanity, the dreams of poets and the agonies of martyrs, are shackled and bound in the service of organized and predatory Greed
In this scrap-book is such testimony relating to my shady side, as I have within the past ten years been able to cut from the columns of my competitors in the business of elevating humanity to a higher plane of mind and morals - my 'loathsome contemporaries.

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