humpback


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hump·back

 (hŭmp′băk′)
n.
1. See hunchback.
2. A humped upper back.
3. A humpback whale.

hump′backed′ adj.

humpback

(ˈhʌmpˌbæk)
n
1. (Pathology) another word for hunchback
2. (Animals) Also called: humpback whale a large whalebone whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, closely related and similar to the rorquals but with a humped back and long flippers: family Balaenopteridae
3. (Animals) a Pacific salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, the male of which has a humped back and hooked jaws
4. (Civil Engineering) Also called: humpback bridge Brit a road bridge having a sharp incline and decline and usually a narrow roadway
[C17: alteration of earlier crumpbacked, perhaps influenced by hunchback; perhaps related to Dutch homp lump]
ˈhumpˌbacked adj

hump•back

(ˈhʌmpˌbæk)

n.
1. a back that is humped in a convex position.
[1690–1700; appar. back formation from humpbacked]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humpback - an abnormal backward curve to the vertebral columnhumpback - an abnormal backward curve to the vertebral column
spinal curvature - an abnormal curvature of the vertebral column
2.humpback - a person whose back is hunched because of abnormal curvature of the upper spine
3.humpback - large whalebone whale with long flippers noted for arching or humping its back as it diveshumpback - large whalebone whale with long flippers noted for arching or humping its back as it dives
baleen whale, whalebone whale - whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
genus Megaptera, Megaptera - humpback whales
Translations
ظَهْرٌ مُحَدَّبمُحَدَّب
do obloukuhrbáč
hvælvetpukkelryg
baleine à bossebossu
eins og hnúîur, kryppu-kryppa, herîakistill
do oblúka
kamburkamburlu

humpback

[ˈhʌmpbæk] N
1. (= person) → jorobado/a m/f
to have a humpbackser jorobado
2. (= whale) (also humpback whale) → rorcual m

humpback

[ˈhʌmpbæk] nbossu(e) m/fhumpbacked bridge humpback bridge n (mainly British)dos m d'ânehumpback whale nbaleine f à bosse

humpback

n (= person)Buck(e)lige(r) mf; (= back)Buckel m

humpback

[ˈhʌmpˌbæk] n (also humpback bridge) → ponte m a schiena d'asino

hump

(hamp) noun
1. a large lump on the back of an animal, person etc. a camel's hump.
2. part of a road etc which rises and falls in the shape of a hump.
ˈhumpback noun
a back with a hump.
adjective
rising and falling in the shape of a hump. a humpback bridge.
ˈhumpbacked adjective
having a hump on the back.

humpback

n (fam o vulg) joroba
References in classic literature ?
An anatomist--even a mere physiognomist-- would have seen that the deformity of Philip's spine was not a congenital hump, but the result of an accident in infancy; but you do not expect from Tom any acquaintance with such distinctions; to him, Philip was simply a humpback. He had a vague notion that the deformity of Wakem's son had some relation to the lawyer's rascality, of which he had so often heard his father talk with hot emphasis; and he felt, too, a half-admitted fear of him as probably a spiteful fellow, who, not being able to fight you, had cunning ways of doing you a mischief by the sly.
Humpback? Do you want a kick?" By the lord, Flask, I had no sooner said that, than he turned round his stern to me, bent over, and dragging up a lot of seaweed he had for a clout --what do you think, I saw?
I am as suspicious and prone to take offence as a humpback or a dwarf.
While crossing, I saw numerous whales belonging to the three kinds peculiar to the southern seas; the whale, or the English "right whale," which has no dorsal fin; the "humpback," with reeved chest and large, whitish fins, which, in spite of its name, do not form wings; and the fin-back, of a yellowish brown, the liveliest of all the cetacea.
The travel history of a humpback whale spotted off the coast of Scotland has been tracked with the help of social media.
A GROUP nature lovers were given an amazing treat after a giant humpback whale swam incredibly close to their boat.
In a stunning photo, a wildlife photographer has captured a sea lion falling into the mouth of a humpback whale in what he calls a "once-in-a-lifetime" moment.
Following severe decline due to commercial whaling (Tannessen and Johnsen, 1982), humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski 1781) populations in the North Atlantic region have been undergoing steady recovery during the latter part of the twentieth century (Katona and Beard, 1990; Weir et al.
Humpback whales have been filling up before setting off to make babies around the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic, the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group said.
The fishing gear that snared a humpback whale causing its death on the north Caithness coast came from thousands of miles away in Nova Scotia.
Bringing Back the Humpback Whale (Animals Back from the Brink)