humus


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hu·mus 1

 (hyo͞o′məs)
n.
A brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter that provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.

[Latin, soil; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots.]

hum·us 2

 (ho͝om′əs, hŭm′-)
n.
Variant of hummus.

humus

(ˈhjuːməs)
n
(Biology) a dark brown or black colloidal mass of partially decomposed organic matter in the soil. It improves the fertility and water retention of the soil and is therefore important for plant growth
[C18: from Latin: soil, earth]
Usage: Avoid confusion with hummus

hu•mus

(ˈhyu məs; often ˈyu-)

n.
the dark organic material in soils, produced by the decomposition of vegetable or animal matter.
[1790–1800; < Latin: earth, ground; akin to Greek chamaí on the ground, chthṓn earth, Skt kṣam-, Lithuanian žẽmė, Serbo-Croatian zèmlja ground, earth]

hu·mus

(hyo͞o′məs)
A dark-brown or black organic substance made up of decayed plant or animal matter. Humus provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.

humus

The organic content of soil produced as a result of the decomposition of plants and animals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humus - partially decomposed organic matterhumus - partially decomposed organic matter; the organic component of soil
A horizon, A-horizon - the top layer of a soil profile; usually contains humus
dirt, soil - the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
2.humus - a thick spread made from mashed chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice and garlic; used especially as a dip for pita; originated in the Middle East
paste, spread - a tasty mixture to be spread on bread or crackers or used in preparing other dishes
Translations
humus
humus
moldefni, húmus
humusaspuvenos
humuss
humuskara toprak

humus

[ˈhjuːməs] N (Bio) → humus m

humus

[ˈhuːməs] nhumus m

humus

nHumus m

humus

[ˈhjuːməs] nhumus m

humus

(ˈhjuːməs) noun
a substance like earth, made of decayed plants, leaves etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalSome 83-100 percent of the soils sampled did not meet the minimum humus threshold.
[ClickPress, Tue Mar 12 2019] Humus Concentrate Market Outlook: In the field of agriculture, fertilizers and pesticides are the major inputs that are required.
When the plant residue of the cover crop is dug into the soil, it enriches the soil, providing valuable humus and micronutrients.
This humus can replenish nutrients in your garden or yard.
In the present work (1) the indices of pedodiversity, (2) humus status and humus cover types (pro humus forms), (3) soil cover productivity (quality) in connection with the suitability of soils for crops and (4) environment protection ability (EPA) of soils are discussed.
This prevents increase in lumpiness and on the other hand, preserves the microorganisms involved in the formation of humus," Orujov said.
affiliates, in partnership with Argentina-based private equity firm Humus Capital Partners (HCP), have acquired a majority equity interest in Biosidus S.A.
Buyer: ACON Latin America Opportunities Fund IV, Humus Capital Partners
The best among the ones we ordered was the Humus and grilled sweet peppers.
From the Portuguese "black earth," terra preta refers to a rich soil composed of humus (decomposed organic substances) and biochar (carbon derived from charcoal).