humus


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hu·mus 1

 (hyo͞o′məs)
n.
A brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter that provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.

[Latin, soil; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots.]

hum·us 2

 (ho͝om′əs, hŭm′-)
n.
Variant of hummus.

humus

(ˈhjuːməs)
n
(Biology) a dark brown or black colloidal mass of partially decomposed organic matter in the soil. It improves the fertility and water retention of the soil and is therefore important for plant growth
[C18: from Latin: soil, earth]
Usage: Avoid confusion with hummus

hu•mus

(ˈhyu məs; often ˈyu-)

n.
the dark organic material in soils, produced by the decomposition of vegetable or animal matter.
[1790–1800; < Latin: earth, ground; akin to Greek chamaí on the ground, chthṓn earth, Skt kṣam-, Lithuanian žẽmė, Serbo-Croatian zèmlja ground, earth]

hu·mus

(hyo͞o′məs)
A dark-brown or black organic substance made up of decayed plant or animal matter. Humus provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.

humus

The organic content of soil produced as a result of the decomposition of plants and animals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humus - partially decomposed organic matterhumus - partially decomposed organic matter; the organic component of soil
A horizon, A-horizon - the top layer of a soil profile; usually contains humus
dirt, soil - the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
2.humus - a thick spread made from mashed chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice and garlic; used especially as a dip for pita; originated in the Middle East
paste, spread - a tasty mixture to be spread on bread or crackers or used in preparing other dishes
Translations
humus
humus
moldefni, húmus
humusaspuvenos
humuss
humuskara toprak

humus

[ˈhjuːməs] N (Bio) → humus m

humus

[ˈhuːməs] nhumus m

humus

nHumus m

humus

[ˈhjuːməs] nhumus m

humus

(ˈhjuːməs) noun
a substance like earth, made of decayed plants, leaves etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
BD compost preparations are used to treat compost piles, enhancing the breakdown, fermentation, and decomposition of raw compost materials, and help the rebuilding of refuse into stable humus, full of life.
Worm humus, a derivative of worm excrement, is considered one of the best natural fertilizers and has shown excellent results with vegetables, tobacco, flowers and fruits, besides preventing environmental pollution.
Humus can increase soil colloidal capacity as it will hold cations and anions including nitrates allowing the soil's fundamental fertility to be changed to a higher level.
On the small side in the humus fauna are the bacteria, protozoa, and nematode worms.
The decomposed solid waste in a landfill is usable as a humus or soil conditioner.
In autumn, mulch fallen leaves into the soil to add nutrients and humus.
Humic substances, such as the humus gardeners use, abound in the environments where bacteria live.
In the research into soil ecology and the role of organic matter (humus) in it, the accent is on the superficial (rich in SOM) part of the soil profile or on the humus cover (HC), whose fabric may be characterized by the humus profile (Chertov, 1966; Dergacheva, 1985).
Electronic auction: development of design estimates for a complex of works on liming of acidic soils and authors control over its application, agrochemical inspection of agricultural lands (including field survey, analysis of soil samples for acidity and humus content, desk processing of materials), manufacturing of acid maps (office processing materials)
For the classics, we ordered Fol with oil and lemon, a mixed stuffed Ta'meya plate, humus with grilled sweet peppers, and Halloumi cheese.
Humus physical-chemical features obtained from biosolids from wastewater treatment processes
From the Portuguese "black earth," terra preta refers to a rich soil composed of humus (decomposed organic substances) and biochar (carbon derived from charcoal).