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Related to hunkers: inconvenience


intr.v. hun·kered, hun·ker·ing, hun·kers
1. To squat close to the ground; crouch. Usually used with down: hunkered down to avoid the icy wind.
2. To take shelter, settle in, or hide out. Usually used with down: hunkered down in the cabin during the blizzard.
3. To hold stubbornly to a position. Usually used with down: "As the White House hunkered down, G.O.P. congressional unity started crumbling" (Time).
n. hunkers
The haunches.

[Perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse hokra, to crouch.]


pl n
[C18: of uncertain origin]
References in classic literature ?
He did, in fact, die from the operation, but not before he had deeded Tiny Soderball his claim on Hunker Creek.
But the Infant had already made the sign, and we heard Imam Din hunker down on the floor: One gets little out of the East at attention.
In the end, he ascended Dominion Creek to its head, crossed the divide, and came down on the tributary to the Klondike that was later to be called Hunker Creek.