husbandry


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Related to husbandry: Sheep husbandry

hus·band·ry

 (hŭz′bən-drē)
n.
1.
a. The act or practice of cultivating crops and breeding and raising livestock; agriculture.
b. The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.
2. Careful management or conservation of resources; economy.

[Middle English husbondri, from huseband, husband; see husband.]

husbandry

(ˈhʌzbəndrɪ)
n
1. (Agriculture) farming, esp when regarded as a science, skill, or art
2. management of affairs and resources

hus•band•ry

(ˈhʌz bən dri)

n.
1. the cultivation of crops and the raising of livestock.
2. the application of scientific principles to farming. Compare animal husbandry.
3. careful or thrifty management; frugality, thrift, or conservation.
4. Archaic. the management of domestic affairs or of resources generally.
[1250–1300]

hus·band·ry

(hŭz′bən-drē)
The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.

husbandry

1. Obsolete, domestic management, thrift, or frugality.
2. farming, especially the care of farm animals.
See also: Agriculture
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.husbandry - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stockhusbandry - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
cultivation - (agriculture) production of food by preparing the land to grow crops (especially on a large scale)
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
arboriculture, tree farming - the cultivation of tree for the production of timber
dairy farming, dairying - the business of a dairy
gardening, horticulture - the cultivation of plants
tilling - cultivation of the land in order to raise crops
aquiculture, hydroponics, tank farming - a technique of growing plants (without soil) in water containing dissolved nutrients
mixed farming - growing crops and feed and livestock all on the same farm
planting - putting seeds or young plants in the ground to grow; "the planting of corn is hard work"
ranching - farming for the raising of livestock (particularly cattle)
strip cropping - cultivation of crops in strips following the contours of the land to minimize erosion
subsistence farming - farming that provides for the basic needs of the farmer without surpluses for marketing
harvest time, harvest - the season for gathering crops
truck farming - growing vegetables for the market
smut - affect with smut or mildew, as of a crop such as corn
fertilize, fertilise, feed - provide with fertilizers or add nutrients to; "We should fertilize soil if we want to grow healthy plants"
thresh, thrash - beat the seeds out of a grain
sow, seed - place (seeds) in or on the ground for future growth; "She sowed sunflower seeds"
broadcast - sow over a wide area, especially by hand; "broadcast seeds"
inseminate, sow in, sow - place seeds in or on (the ground); "sow the ground with sunflower seeds"
reseed - seed again or anew
farm, produce, raise, grow - cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques; "The Bordeaux region produces great red wines"; "They produce good ham in Parma"; "We grow wheat here"; "We raise hogs here"
carry - bear (a crop); "this land does not carry olives"
till - work land as by ploughing, harrowing, and manuring, in order to make it ready for cultivation; "till the soil"
crop, cultivate, work - prepare for crops; "Work the soil"; "cultivate the land"
overcrop, overcultivate - to exhaust by excessive cultivation; "the farmers overcropped the land"
plow, plough, turn - to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring"
ridge - plough alternate strips by throwing the furrow onto an unploughed strip
disk, harrow - draw a harrow over (land)
hoe - dig with a hoe; "He is hoeing the flower beds"
cultivate - foster the growth of

husbandry

noun
1. farming, agriculture, cultivation, land management, tillage, agronomy The current juvenile harvest suggests poor husbandry.
2. thrift, economy, good housekeeping, frugality, careful management These people consider themselves adept at financial husbandry.

husbandry

noun
The careful guarding of an asset:
Translations
زِراعَه، فِلاحَه
hospodaření
landbrug
állattenyésztés
búskapur; stjórn; hagsÿni í búskap
hospodárenie

husbandry

[ˈhʌzbəndrɪ] N
1. (Agr) → agricultura f
animal husbandrycría f de animales
2. (= administration) (also good husbandry) → buena administración f, buena gestión f

husbandry

n
(= management)Haushalten nt, → Wirtschaften nt
(= farming)Landwirtschaft f

husband

(ˈhazbənd) noun
a man to whom a woman is married.
verb
to spend or use carefully, a little at a time. He needs to husband his strength.
ˈhusbandry noun
management, especially of a farm or animals.
References in classic literature ?
As I had little aid from horses or cattle, or hired men or boys, or improved implements of husbandry, I was much slower, and became much more intimate with my beans than usual.
Those summer days which some of my contemporaries devoted to the fine arts in Boston or Rome, and others to contemplation in India, and others to trade in London or New York, I thus, with the other farmers of New England, devoted to husbandry.
Far back in the twilight of history, at least 1,700 years before Christ, the Chinese people sang their songs of kings and feudal princes good or bad, of husbandry, or now and then songs with the more personal note of simple joys and sorrows.
It is evident then that the getting of money is not the same thing as economy, for the business of the one is to furnish the means of the other to use them; and what art is there employed in the management of a family but economy, but whether this is a part of it, or something of a different species, is a doubt; for if it is the business of him who is to get money to find out how riches and possessions may be procured, and both these arise from various causes, we must first inquire whether the art of husbandry is part of money-getting or something different, and in general, whether the same is not true of every acquisition and every attention which relates to provision.
Pointing to the fields, he spoke of the improvements he was making in his husbandry.
But he saw clearly now (his work on a book of agriculture, in which the chief element in husbandry was to have been the laborer, greatly assisted him in this) that the sort of farming he was carrying on was nothing but a cruel and stubborn struggle between him and the laborers, in which there was on one side--his side--a continual intense effort to change everything to a pattern he considered better; on the other side, the natural order of things.
As their strength and their grandeur, so their navigation, commerce, and husbandry are very imperfect, compared to the same things in Europe; also, in their knowledge, their learning, and in their skill in the sciences, they are either very awkward or defective, though they have globes or spheres, and a smattering of the mathematics, and think they know more than all the world besides.
We were twenty-five days travelling to Pekin, through a country exceeding populous, but I think badly cultivated; the husbandry, the economy, and the way of living miserable, though they boast so much of the industry of the people: I say miserable, if compared with our own, but not so to these poor wretches, who know no other.
Others are taught husbandry, and the rearing of cattle and horses; while the females card and spin wool, weave, and perform the other duties allotted to their sex in civilized life.
As to persons of quality, they give security to appropriate a certain sum for each child, suitable to their condition; and these funds are always managed with good husbandry and the most exact justice.
It hardly becomes so young a man as I am to talk much about farming to you, who are most of you so much older, and are men of experience; still, I have interested myself a good deal in such matters, and learned as much about them as my opportunities have allowed; and when the course of events shall place the estate in my hands, it will be my first desire to afford my tenants all the encouragement a landlord can give them, in improving their land and trying to bring about a better practice of husbandry.
And herein the device of king Henry the Seventh (whereof I have spoken largely in the History of his Life) was profound and admirable; in making farms and houses of husbandry of a standard; that is, maintained with such a proportion of land unto them, as may breed a subject to live in convenient plenty and no servile condition; and to keep the plough in the hands of the owners, and not mere hirelings.