hutch


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hutch

 (hŭch)
n.
1. A pen or coop for small animals, especially rabbits.
2. A cupboard with drawers for storage and usually open or glass-fronted shelves on top, often used for dishes.
3. A chest or bin for storage.
4. A hut.

[Middle English huche, chest, from Old French, from Medieval Latin hūtica, possibly of Germanic origin.]

hutch

(hʌtʃ)
n
1. (Zoology) a cage, usually of wood and wire mesh, for small animals
2. informal derogatory a small house
3. (Mining & Quarrying) a cart for carrying ore
4. (Mining & Quarrying) a trough, esp one used for kneading dough or (in mining) for washing ore
vb
(tr) to store or keep in or as if in a hutch
[C14 hucche, from Old French huche, from Medieval Latin hutica, of obscure origin]

hutch

(hʌtʃ)

n.
1. a pen or enclosed coop for small animals: a rabbit hutch.
2. a chestlike cabinet with doors or drawers, usu. with open shelves above.
3. a chest, bin, etc., for storage.
4. a small cottage or hut.
[1275–1325; Middle English hucche, variant of whucce, Old English hwicce chest]

hutch


Past participle: hutched
Gerund: hutching

Imperative
hutch
hutch
Present
I hutch
you hutch
he/she/it hutches
we hutch
you hutch
they hutch
Preterite
I hutched
you hutched
he/she/it hutched
we hutched
you hutched
they hutched
Present Continuous
I am hutching
you are hutching
he/she/it is hutching
we are hutching
you are hutching
they are hutching
Present Perfect
I have hutched
you have hutched
he/she/it has hutched
we have hutched
you have hutched
they have hutched
Past Continuous
I was hutching
you were hutching
he/she/it was hutching
we were hutching
you were hutching
they were hutching
Past Perfect
I had hutched
you had hutched
he/she/it had hutched
we had hutched
you had hutched
they had hutched
Future
I will hutch
you will hutch
he/she/it will hutch
we will hutch
you will hutch
they will hutch
Future Perfect
I will have hutched
you will have hutched
he/she/it will have hutched
we will have hutched
you will have hutched
they will have hutched
Future Continuous
I will be hutching
you will be hutching
he/she/it will be hutching
we will be hutching
you will be hutching
they will be hutching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hutching
you have been hutching
he/she/it has been hutching
we have been hutching
you have been hutching
they have been hutching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hutching
you will have been hutching
he/she/it will have been hutching
we will have been hutching
you will have been hutching
they will have been hutching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hutching
you had been hutching
he/she/it had been hutching
we had been hutching
you had been hutching
they had been hutching
Conditional
I would hutch
you would hutch
he/she/it would hutch
we would hutch
you would hutch
they would hutch
Past Conditional
I would have hutched
you would have hutched
he/she/it would have hutched
we would have hutched
you would have hutched
they would have hutched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hutch - a cage (usually made of wood and wire mesh) for small animalshutch - a cage (usually made of wood and wire mesh) for small animals
cage, coop - an enclosure made or wire or metal bars in which birds or animals can be kept
rabbit hutch - a hutch for rabbits
2.hutch - small crude shelter used as a dwellinghutch - small crude shelter used as a dwelling
igloo, iglu - an Eskimo hut; usually built of blocks (of sod or snow) in the shape of a dome
mudhif - a reed hut in the marshlands of Iraq; rare since the marshes were drained
shelter - a structure that provides privacy and protection from danger
Translations
خَزانَة مَطْبَخ مفتوحَة الرفوفقفَص للأرانِب
králíkárnakredenc
burtallerkenskab
felsõszekrény
búr
bufetebūris
králikáreňkredenc
dolaptavşan kafesi

hutch

[hʌtʃ] Nconejera f

hutch

[ˈhʌtʃ] nclapier m

hutch

nVerschlag m, → Stall m

hutch

[hʌtʃ] ngabbia (per conigli)

hutch

(hatʃ) noun
1. a box with a wire front in which rabbits are kept.
2. (American) a cupboard with open shelves above for dishes.
References in classic literature ?
The walls were black; there was an opening to admit the light above the worm-eaten door; and here and there were a few stools consisting of rough blocks of beech-wood, each set upon three wooden legs; a hutch for bread, a large wooden dipper, a bucket and some earthen milk-pans, a spinning-wheel on the top of the bread-hutch, and a few wicker mats for draining cheeses.
He then lays certain silver money on the table, finds his hat, gropes his way down the broken stairs, gives a good morning to some rat-ridden doorkeeper, in bed in a black hutch beneath the stairs, and passes out.
It looks to me sometimes as if I had been born to them by a mistake--in that other hutch of a house."
I cannot express what a satisfaction it was to me to come into my old hutch, and lie down in my hammock-bed.
It consisted of a rude wooden stool, and still ruder hutch or bed-frame, stuffed with clean straw, and accommodated with two or three sheepskins by way of bed-clothes.
Snagsby and the proprietress of the house--a drunken face tied up in a black bundle, and flaring out of a heap of rags on the floor of a dog- hutch which is her private apartment--leads to the establishment of this conclusion.
The man leaned over and pulled up the front of a kind of hutch in the corner.
Farther under the starboard bulwark were some big hutches containing a number of rabbits, and a solitary llama was squeezed in a mere box of a cage forward.
Cramped in all kinds of dun cupboards and hutches at Tellson's, the oldest of men carried on the business gravely.
There was just the ordinary surface scum of ledgers and polished counters and brass bars that began and stopped for no possible reason, of electric-light globes blossoming in triplets, of little rabbit hutches faced with glass or wire, of little rabbits.
I may add, that as some organisms will breed most freely under the most unnatural conditions (for instance, the rabbit and ferret kept in hutches), showing that their reproductive system has not been thus affected; so will some animals and plants withstand domestication or cultivation, and vary very slightly--perhaps hardly more than in a state of nature.
He went courting the daughter of an old sea-captain who was a churchwarden of his parish and lived in an old badly preserved Georgian house with a garden: one of these houses standing in a reduced bit of "grounds" that you discover in a labyrinth of the most sordid streets, exactly alike and composed of six-roomed hutches.