hyaluronic acid

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hy·a·lu·ron·ic acid

 (hī′ə-lo͝o-rŏn′ĭk)
n.
A glycosaminoglycan that is found in extracellular tissue space, the synovial fluid of joints, and the vitreous humor of the eyes and acts as a binding, lubricating, and protective agent.

[Greek hualos, glass + -uronic.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hyaluronic acid

(ˌhaɪəlʊˈrɒnɪk)
n
(Biochemistry) a viscous polysaccharide with important lubricating properties, present, for example, in the synovial fluid in joints
[C20: hyalo- + Greek ouron urine + -ic]
ˌhyaluˈronic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy′a•lu•ron′ic ac′id

(ˈhaɪ ə lʊˈrɒn ɪk, ˌhaɪ-)

n.
a mucopolysaccharide serving as a viscous medium in the tissues of the body and as a lubricant in joints.
[1930–35; hyal (oid) (in reference to the vitreous humor, from which it was first isolated) + uronic acid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyaluronic acid - a viscous mucopolysaccharide found in the connective tissue space and the synovial fluid of movable joints and the humors of the eye; a cementing and protective substance
vitreous body, vitreous humor, vitreous humour - the clear colorless transparent jelly that fills the posterior chamber of the eyeball
synovia, synovial fluid - viscid lubricating fluid secreted by the membrane lining joints and tendon sheaths etc.
mucopolysaccharide - complex polysaccharides containing an amino group; occur chiefly as components of connective tissue
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hy·a·lu·ron·ic ac·id

n. ácido hialurónico, presente en la sustancia del tejido conjuntivo, actúa como lubricante y agente conector.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hyaluronic acid

n ácido hialurónico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company said the Juvederm VOLUMA XC, which is a hyaluronic acid gel dermal filler, along with the TSK STERiGLIDE cannula, is used for cheek augmentation to correct age-related volume deficit in the mid-face in adults over 21.
M2 PRESSWIRE-September 4, 2019-: Matexcel Provides a Comprehensive List of Hyaluronic Acid Products
HHHHH BARRY M CALMING ROSE SERUM MIST PS5.99, superdrug HYALURONIC acid and collagen in a very nice, non-sticky spray mist.
REVOLUTION SKIN HYALURONIC ESSENCE SPRAY PS6, revolutionbeauty.com ENRICHED with hyaluronic acid and grapefruit to help tight skin feel bouncy again - which it did quite nicely.
Hyaluronic acid is similar to a substance that occurs naturally in the joints.
...Barry M Calming Rose Serum Mist, PS5.99 Our tester says: "Hyaluronic acid and collagen in a very nice, non-sticky spray mist.
It felt refreshing, and added a noticeable glow to my make-up that, come midafternoon, was starting to look dry and patchy.' Barry M Calming Rose Serum Mist, PS5.99 Beauty editor Octavia says: 'Hyaluronic acid and collagen in a very nice, non-sticky spray mist.
Summary: Hyaluronic acid is a glycosaminoglycan widely distributed throughout neural, epithelial, and connective tissue.
Collagen and hyaluronic acid are natural skin components that maintain moisture, support elasticity and promote smoothness.
BD, a global medical technology company, presented BD HylokTM, its new glass pre-fillable syringe for the administration of viscous solutions such as hyaluronic acid dermal fillers, at Pharmapack 2019.
The common ingredient found in the starchy root vegetables is hyaluronic acid, a gel-like substance that lubricates our joints, cartilage, and skin tissues.