hybridism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hy·brid

 (hī′brĭd)
n.
1. Genetics The offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock, especially the offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties, species, or races.
2.
a. Something of mixed origin or composition, such as a word whose elements are derived from different languages.
b. Something having two kinds of components that produce the same or similar results, such as a vehicle powered by both an electric motor and an internal combustion engine as sources of power for the drivetrain.

[Latin hibrida, hybrida, mongrel.]

hy′brid·ism n.
hy′brid·ist n.
hy·brid′i·ty (hī-brĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hybridism

1. a word formed from elements drawn from different languages.
2. the practice of coining such words. — hybrid, n., adj.
See also: Linguistics
1. a word formed from elements drawn from different languages.
2. the practice of coining such words.
See also: Language
the blending of diverse cultures or traditions.
See also: Anthropology
Translations

hybridism

[ˈhaɪbrɪdɪzəm] Nhibridismo m

hybridism

n (lit, fig)Hybridismus m
References in classic literature ?
In the four succeeding chapters, the most apparent and gravest difficulties on the theory will be given: namely, first, the difficulties of transitions, or in understanding how a simple being or a simple organ can be changed and perfected into a highly developed being or elaborately constructed organ; secondly the subject of Instinct, or the mental powers of animals, thirdly, Hybridism, or the infertility of species and the fertility of varieties when intercrossed; and fourthly, the imperfection of the Geological Record.
'He represents in little India in transition - the monstrous hybridism of East and West,' the Russian replied.
Consisting of three chapters, part 2, "Hybridism and Aesthetic Creativity," addresses the ways in which migrants use music in the negotiation of identity.
In particular, in his famous text "Encoding/Decoding," Hall (2001) suggested new frameworks for reading texts, "restructuring reception studies, even in the field of cinema--but emphasizing, developing, deepening and questioning concepts such as representation, identity, alterity, hybridism, colonization, the West and the East" (Prysthon, 2016: 79).
Lopez-Varela concludes that "fictionalization is essential to the creation of the transitional realm that renders the representation of affective life experience in terms of generic and intermedial hybridism" (91).
The types of code-switching present in Sanchez' writing vary, and are not radical according to Torres' definition--a code-switching text only accessible to the bilingual reader (Torres 2007, in Casielles-Suarez 2013: 477)--but rather are what Casielles-Suarez describes as "radical hybridism" (2013: 477).
This was the view Olson took when he mocked the New Critics for attempting to bring "literary study to a condition rivaling that of the sciences." (110) Similarly, John Holloway declared in 1953 that "the heredity of close reading is a heredity of hybridism." (111) The argument is worth quoting more fully:
The hybridism of image and dialogue offers a rich analysis into the significance of socio-spatiality in higher education, in particular, among marginalized populations.
By fusing together disparate languages, conventions and myths, I am seeking an iconography of hybridism, where the underlying common threads can be found.