hybridist


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hy·brid

 (hī′brĭd)
n.
1. Genetics The offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock, especially the offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties, species, or races.
2.
a. Something of mixed origin or composition, such as a word whose elements are derived from different languages.
b. Something having two kinds of components that produce the same or similar results, such as a vehicle powered by both an electric motor and an internal combustion engine as sources of power for the drivetrain.

[Latin hibrida, hybrida, mongrel.]

hy′brid·ism n.
hy′brid·ist n.
hy·brid′i·ty (hī-brĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hybridist

(ˈhaɪbrɪdɪst)
n
(Agriculture) someone who hybridizes or cross-breeds (animals or plants)
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea should be the value of hybridist systems and a mixture of these two apparent heterogeneous ideas.
Its cultivated cousins, which produce a vast array of beautiful flowers, some with frilled petals, some with rich colour, others with delicate picotee edges, are a hybridist's dream.
Matucana's cultivated cousins, a vast array of beautiful flowers, some with frilled petals, some with rich colour, others with delicate picotee edges, are a hybridist's dream and every year new varieties are introduced, often named after celebs or royals.
The cultivated cousins of 'Matucana' are a hybridist's dream - a vast array of beautiful flowers, some with frilled petals, some with rich colour, others with delicate picotee edges.
Though Knopf shows awareness of critiques of postcolonial and hybridist theories, she continues with a line of argument that runs the danger of relegating Native filmmakers to mere crossbreeds of more authentic forms of creative expression.
The full history of x Aechbergiopsis 'Pita' is still unrecorded but probably is an Australian-bred cross from the late 1980s with the hybridist unknown but mistakenly grown as Hohenbergiopsis guatemalensis.
Childs and Williams argue that "[d]iaspora can be aligned with other by now familiar terms, such as hybridist, syncretism, and realisation, which promote both the liberating aspects of ...
This quirk of the sweet pea allows the hybridist to select parents and make his own crosses in his own garden.