elixir

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e·lix·ir

 (ĭ-lĭk′sər)
n.
1. A sweetened aromatic solution of alcohol and water, serving as a vehicle for medicine.
2.
b. A substance believed to maintain life indefinitely. Also called elixir of life.
c. A substance or medicine believed to have the power to cure all ills.
3. An underlying principle.

[Middle English, a substance of transmutative properties, from Old French elissir, from Medieval Latin elixir, from Arabic al-'iksīr : al, the + 'iksīr, elixir (probably from Greek xērion, desiccative powder, from xēros, dry).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

elixir

(ɪˈlɪksə)
n
1. (Alchemy) an alchemical preparation supposed to be capable of prolonging life indefinitely (elixir of life) or of transmuting base metals into gold
2. anything that purports to be a sovereign remedy; panacea
3. an underlying principle; quintessence
4. (Pharmacology) a liquid containing a medicinal drug with syrup, glycerine, or alcohol added to mask its unpleasant taste
[C14: from Medieval Latin, from Arabic al iksīr the elixir, probably from Greek xērion powder used for drying wounds, from xēros dry]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•lix•ir

(ɪˈlɪk sər)

n.
1. a sweetened aromatic solution of alcohol and water containing or used as a vehicle for medicinal substances.
2. Also called elix′ir of life′. an alchemic preparation believed capable of prolonging life indefinitely.
3. an alchemic preparation believed to be capable of transmuting base metals into gold.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin < Arabic al iksīr alchemical preparation < Late Greek xḗrion drying powder (for wounds), derivative of Greek xērós dry]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

elixir

- Derives from Arabic al-'iksir, "the powder for drying wounds."
See also related terms for powder.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

elixir

1. a tincture composed of a sweetened solution of alcohol to which has been added a small amount of the drug to be administered.
2. a panacea, cure-all, or universal remedy. See also alchemy.
See also: Remedies
1. the hypothetical substance sought by alchemists that was believed to transform base metals into gold and give eternal life. Also called philosopher’s stone, elixir of life.
2. Rare. the quintessence or underlying principle. See also remedies.
See also: Alchemy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elixir - a sweet flavored liquid (usually containing a small amount of alcohol) used in compounding medicines to be taken by mouth in order to mask an unpleasant taste
liquid - fluid matter having no fixed shape but a fixed volume
2.elixir - hypothetical substance that the alchemists believed to be capable of changing base metals into gold
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
3.elixir - a substance believed to cure all ills
catholicon, cure-all, nostrum, panacea - hypothetical remedy for all ills or diseases; once sought by the alchemists
potion - a medicinal or magical or poisonous beverage
elixir of life - a hypothetical substance believed to maintain life indefinitely; once sought by alchemists
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

elixir

noun
1. panacea, cure-all, nostrum, sovereign remedy a magical elixir of eternal youth
2. syrup, essence, solution, concentrate, mixture, extract, potion, distillation, tincture, distillate For severe teething pains, try an infant paracetamol elixir.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

elixir

noun
An agent used to restore health:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إكْسير الحَياه
eliksireliskirmirakelmedicin
eliksiiri
elixír
elixír, gullgerîarefni
eliksyras
eliksīrs

elixir

[ɪˈlɪksəʳ] Nelixir m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

elixir

[ɪˈlɪksər] n (literary)élixir m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

elixir

nElixier nt, → Auszug m; elixir of lifeLebenselixier nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

elixir

[ɪˈlɪksəʳ] nelisir m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

elixir

(iˈliksə) noun
a liquid that would supposedly make people able to go on living for ever, or a substance that would turn the cheaper metals into gold. the elixir of life.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

e·lix·ir

n. elixir, licor dulce y aromático que contiene un ingrediente medicinal activo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

elixir

n elíxir or elixir m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of Salvia sahendica hydroalcoholic extract on PTZinduced seizure in male mice.
The hydroalcoholic propolis extracts (wild rosemary and green) with 11% concentration of propolis (w [v.sup.-1]) were dissolved in 70% grain alcohol solution to achieve a final concentration of 2.5%.
Therefore, this study investigated the potential of hydroalcoholic extract of C.
In this context, we recently demonstrated that the leaf hydroalcoholic extract obtained from pomegranate is anti-inflammatory as it inhibits TNF-[alpha] production and decreases neutrophil migration in a rat model of lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) induced acute peritonitis [8].
Protective role of hydroalcoholic extract of Ficus carica in gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in rats.
The polyherbal formula being investigated consisted of Allium sativum (cloves) 4.7%, Aloe vera (leaves) 4.7%, Nigella sativa (seeds) 28.1%, Plantago psyllium (seeds) 15.6%, Silybum marianum (hydroalcoholic extract) 7.8% and Trigonella foenum-graecum (seeds) 39.1%.
Considering all the above, the present work aimed to investigate the mechanisms of action of different extracts (aqueous, hydroalcoholic and hexane) of L.
vulgaris and Achillea millefolium (yarrow), as well as propolis hydroalcoholic extracts, were effective in treating cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice and recommended the study of these extracts alone or in combination in human trials.
The refrigerated maca hypocotyls were cut into slices and soaked in aqueous ethanol (70%, v/v) at room temperature for 24 hours with a solid to solvent ratio of 1:10 (w/v) in triplicate, and the combined filtrate was concentrated using a rotary evaporator (Tokyo, Japan) under vacuum at 40[degrees]C to a constant weight to obtain the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) of maca.
In this paper, different aerial parts of the Rudbeckia triloba were used to obtain essential oil, infusion, decoct, and hydroalcoholic macerate.
They have reported that a hydroalcoholic extract of this Brazilian plant has a positive potential during the wound healing.