hydrogen embrittlement


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hydrogen embrittlement

(ɪmˈbrɪtəlmənt)
n
(General Engineering) engineering the weakening of metal by the sorption of hydrogen during a pickling process, such as that used in plating
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this report, we studied the hydrogen embrittlement of Type-304 and -316 steels by monitoring AE during quasi-static loading in a charging solution at 25[degrees]C and 80[degrees]C.
Fidelle et al., Hydrogen Embrittlement Testing, ASTM-STP 543, ASTM, (1974) p.
In order to determine the hydrogen embrittlement characteristics of the bainitic steels, we have prepared the steels which have a range of different hydrogen contents.
We are achieving a salt spray resistance of up to 1000 hours after phosphate pretreatment." He claims it offers a much higher corrosion protection than standard zinc plating, is economical to apply and does not cause hydrogen embrittlement. Unlike passivated zinc the finish meets the 'end of vehicle life' directives because it is entirely free of chromates.
The problem of trapping of hydrogen in steel is well known and can cause severe damage by hydrogen embrittlement. Also other metals like palladium, zirconium or titanium can absorb high quantities of hydogen.
As the process generates oxygen at the material surface, there is no risk of hydrogen embrittlement."
[29] found that martensite was more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than ferrite, the dominant constituent in the girth weld HAZ from the modern X52 pipe, according to Slifka et al.
McFarlane Aviation's Dave McFarlane told us that his company developed its own FAA-approved U-joints a few years ago after quality problems (hydrogen embrittlement and play) with U-joints sourced from two different aerospace manufacturers.
As users seek improved corrosion protection, now they are also looking for metal coatings that can provide enhanced properties such as resistance to wear and galling, better thickness uniformity, stronger surface adhesion, greater affordability, and resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steel, all while being eco-friendly.
Steels with tensile strength at the level of 800-1000 MPa or higher are considered to be the most susceptible ones to hydrogen embrittlement [5, 6].
Another possible explanation is that hydrogen ion reduction on the corrosion surface could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Differences in microstructure development between the aging methods can lead to markedly different responses to hydrogen exposure [16].