hydrography

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Related to hydrographically: radiographically

hy·drog·ra·phy

 (hī-drŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. hy·drog·ra·phies
1. The scientific description and analysis of the physical conditions, boundaries, flow, and related characteristics of the earth's surface waters.
2. The mapping of bodies of water.

hy·drog′ra·pher n.
hy′dro·graph′ic (hī′drə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
hy′dro·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrography

(haɪˈdrɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the study, surveying, and mapping of the oceans, seas, and rivers. Compare hydrology
2. (Physical Geography) the oceans, seas, and rivers as represented on a chart
hyˈdrographer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•drog•ra•phy

(haɪˈdrɒg rə fi)

n.
1. the science of the measurement, description, and mapping of the surface waters of the earth, esp. with reference to their use for navigation.
2. those parts of a map collectively that represent surface waters.
[1550–60]
hy•drog′ra•pher, n.
hy•dro•graph•ic (ˌhaɪ drəˈgræf ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hydrography

The science which deals with the measurements and description of the physical features of the oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, and their adjoining coastal areas, with particular reference to their use for navigational purposes.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

hydrography

1. the study, description, and mapping of oceans, lakes, and rivers, especially with reference to their use for navigational purposes.
2. those parts of the map, collectively, that represent surface waters. — hydrographer, n.hydrographic, hydrographical, adj.
See also: Water
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hydrography

The study and mapping of rivers, seas, and oceans.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrography - the science of the measurement and description and mapping of the surface waters of the earth with special reference to navigation
oceanography, oceanology - the branch of science dealing with physical and biological aspects of the oceans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hydrography

[haɪˈdrɒgrəfɪ] Nhidrografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hydrography

nGewässerkunde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
As deltas prograde, the main channel of the river--through an inevitable break in the natural levee--finds a more hydrographically efficient route to the sea (Roberts 1997).
Using laser technology, in the right water conditions, CZMIL can rapidly survey the near-shore region, both topographically and hydrographically to safety of navigation specifications in water depths of up to 50 meters.
Future comparative studies of reproductive and other life-history traits may show further characteristic differences between hydrographically and genetically isolated populations of M.
The Great Basin is an extensive region of the arid western United States that is characterized hydrographically by internal drainage (Grayson, 1993).
Under Abu Ya'qub Yusuf an ambitious but ultimately failed project had been undertaken to supply ceuta with water from the hydrographically rich small neighbouring satellite community of Belyunech (Balyunash), and we cannot rule out the possibility that Almohad planning for the Tangier qasba included virtually identical provisions.
(10) This implies that violence over water is strategically irrational, hydrographically ineffective and not economically viable.
He observes that "war over water seems neither strategically rational, nor hydrographically effective nor economically viable." In other words, there is little reason for a "water war" between Egypt and Ethiopia.