hydrothermal

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Related to hydrothermic: Hydrothermal vents

hy·dro·ther·mal

 (hī′drə-thûr′məl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to hot water.
2. Geology
a. Of or relating to hot magmatic emanations rich in water.
b. Of or relating to the rocks, ore deposits, and springs produced by such emanations.

hy′dro·ther′mal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrothermal

(ˌhaɪdrəʊˈθɜːməl)
adj
(Geological Science) of or relating to the action of water under conditions of high temperature, esp in forming rocks and minerals
ˌhydroˈthermally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•dro•ther•mal

(ˌhaɪ drəˈθɜr məl)

adj.
of or pertaining to the action of hot aqueous solutions or gases within or on the surface of the earth.
[1840–50]
hy`dro•ther′mal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·dro·ther·mal

(hī′drə-thûr′məl)
1. Relating to hot water, especially water heated by the Earth's internal heat. ♦ Power that is generated using the Earth's hot water is called hydrothermal energy.
2. Geology Relating to the rocks, ore deposits, and springs produced by hot water or magma.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earthworms' population structure, correlation of hydrothermic conditions and earthworms abundance were studied in semiportable lab.
Further research is needed on the relationship between C[H.sub.4] uptake and hydrothermic factors.
The concentration of elements in the eggshells and associated sediments matched those present during the Gondwanic hydrothermic cycle - a period of geothermal venting that began 134 million years ago, and is believed to have ended by 110 million years ago.