hydroxyapatite

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hy·drox·y·ap·a·tite

 (hī-drŏk′sē-ăp′ĭ-tīt′)
n.
A whitish apatite mineral, calcium hydroxide phosphate, Ca5(OH)(PO4)3, that is the chief mineral component of bones and teeth and provides strength and rigidity to their structures.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydroxyapatite

(haɪˌdrɒksɪˈæpəˌtaɪt) or

hydroxylapatite

n
(Minerals) a natural calcium mineral found in human teeth and bones
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

hy·drox·y·ap·a·tite

n. hidroxiapatita, forma de fosfato de calcio, compuesto inorgánico presente en los dientes y los huesos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Tan et al., "Direct conversion of eggshell to hydroxyapatite ceramic by a sintering method," Ceramics International, vol.
[57.] A.B.H Yoru and Aydinoglu, The precursors effects on biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders.
Bianco, "Osteoconduction in large macroporous hydroxyapatite ceramic implants: evidence for a complementary integration and disintegration mechanism," Bone, vol.
Bianco, "Osteoconduction in large microporous hydroxyapatite ceramic implants: evidence for a complementary integration and disintegration mechanism," Bone, vol.
Aizawa and Rikukawa developed a hydroxyapatite ceramic hybrid material consisting of a porous ceramic structure filled with a biodegradable polymer such as a poly L-lactic acid.
Hydroxyapatite ceramic bodies with tailored mechanical properties for different applications, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, 60(1): 159-166.
The success of bioglass [7], ceravital [8], A-W glass ceramic [9], and dense hydroxyapatite ceramic [10] materials in clinical applications [11] has propelled the search for bioactive glasses and glass ceramics with enhanced properties.
(47.) Soalle, K, "Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Coating for Bone Implant Fixation." Acta Orthop.
The successful application of bioglass (Hench, et al., 1971; Salman, et al., 2009) A-W glass-Ceramic (Kokubo et al., 1985) and dense hydroxyapatite ceramic (Akao et al., 1981; Dewith et al., 1981) materials in clinical application (Vincenzini, 1987) has enthused research in the development of bioactive glasses and bioactive glass-ceramics with enhanced properties.
Other topics of the seven papers include counteracting reliability problems in advanced hip prostheses, an uncemented total hip prosthesis with a hydroxyapatite ceramic coating, and various bearing combinations for total hip arthroplasty.
Hydroxyapatite cement has several advantages over hydroxyapatite ceramic blocks and granules, and it is particularly well suited for calvarial reconstruction.
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