hyoid

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Related to hyoids: Lingual bone

hy·oid

 (hī′oid′)
adj.
Of or relating to the hyoid bone.
n.
The hyoid bone.

[New Latin hȳoīdēs, the hyoid bone, from Greek hūoeidēs, shaped like the letter upsilon : , upsilon + -oeidēs, -oid.]

hyoid

(ˈhaɪɔɪd)
adj
(Anatomy) of or relating to the hyoid bone
n
1. (Anatomy) the horseshoe-shaped bone that lies at the base of the tongue and above the thyroid cartilage
2. (Anatomy) a corresponding bone or group of bones in other vertebrates
[C19: from New Latin hӯoïdes, from Greek huoeidēs having the shape of the letter upsilon, from hu upsilon + -oid]

hy•oid

(ˈhaɪ ɔɪd)

adj.
1. Also, hy•oi′dal, hy•oi′de•an. of or designating a bony or cartilaginous structure at the base of the vertebrate tongue, U-shaped in humans.
n.
2. the hyoid bone or structure.
[1700–10; < New Latin hȳoïdes < Greek hȳoeidḗs shaped like the letter hypsilon (i.e., upsilon) =hŷ, variant of ŷ (see upsilon) + -oeidēs -oid]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyoid - a U-shaped bone at the base of the tongue that supports the tongue muscleshyoid - a U-shaped bone at the base of the tongue that supports the tongue muscles
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
Adj.1.hyoid - of or relating to the hyoid bone
Translations

hy·oid

a. hioideo-a, rel. al hueso hioides.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scouring collections at museums and zoos in the United States and Europe, the team used laser scanners to create 3-D models of hyoids from nine howler species.
The obvious counterargument to this assertion was that the fact that hyoids of Neanderthals were the same shape as modern humans doesn't necessarily mean that they were used in the same way.
3 million years ago had hyoids that were similar in shape to those of present day apes, suggesting they too had air sacs.
1989), as well as two hyoids from Homo heidelbergensis (Martinez et al.
What's beyond debate is that the Atapuerca hyoids look like those of people today, the researchers say.
The Dikika girl's hyoid resembles hyoids of living nonhuman apes, suggesting that she possessed air sacs in her neck as apes do, says coauthor Fred Spoor of University College London.
He says Reidenberg and Laitman use misleading measures that mask the close resemblance of the fossil to modern human hyoids.
There's no basis for comparison, since we have no hyoids from earlier hominids.