hypallage


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Related to hypallage: hysteron proteron

hypallage

(haɪˈpæləˌdʒiː)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a figure of speech in which the natural relations of two words in a statement are interchanged, as in the fire spread the wind
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek hupallagē interchange, from hypo- + allassein to exchange]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hypallage

the deliberate movement for effect and emphasis of one of a group of nouns from a more natural position to one less natural, as Virgil’s “the trumpet’s Tuscan blare” for “the Tuscan trumpet’s blare.” — hypallactic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypallage

The reversal of the usual relationship between two words.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypallage - reversal of the syntactic relation of two words (as in `her beauty's face')
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
was you until your head turned and are you in breathless air The unsatisfactory, halting music of the original is rendered into an epideictic hypallage; a poor cadence is remade into a vibrant sonic image of the thing being described--a mode of the beautiful itself, whose precious rarity in this long satanic ode requires careful cultivation.
Bioy records their mentioning of Virgil's famous hypallage on April 14th 1960 (621).
(84) Ann Pasternak-Slater, 'Hypallage, Barley-Break, and The Changeling', The Review of English Studies 34 (1983), 429-40, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/res/xxxiv.136.429.
In this paper, I shall focus on one specific figure of speech, namely hypallage, metaphor's neighbor, which shares some features of metonymy and enthymeme.
The next two chapters deal with William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream in terms of hypallage or, in Puttenham's irresistible locution, "The Changeling," and Ben Jonson's Epicoene in terms of enallage, or (again, Puttenham) "The Figure of Exchange." These two chapters, in my view, clarify the main difference between Mann's work and Parker's: while Parker will trace the spoor of a pun or trope to the end of the chase, regardless of an unknown or improbable outcome, Mann limits the field.
Chandler's close readings of scenes, for example, from Sterne's Sentimental Journey, Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, and Griffith's 1909 film of Dickens's "The Cricket on the Hearth" (compared, of course, to Dickens's text), are unparalleled in their clarity and their exemplification of key sentimental-mode techniques such as "visual mutuality," "triangulated spectatorship," "dispersed subjectivity," as well as rhetorical tropes such as "hypallage" (exchange of cause for effect or vice-versa) and "syllepsis" (ambiguous slippage between the literal and the figurative).
Chiasmus, a term crossing, forming a parallel or an antithesis: "As our cities are not conceived for the car, our cars are conceived for the city" (Volkswagen); hypallage, a change of assigning to certain words what would logically belong to others : "Hiring Super, it's Citer" (Citer, a make of car hire, instead of saying "Hiring Citer, it's super"); antonymy, a very interesting figure, and also much-used to achieve a persuasive effect: "The less you drive, the faster you go"(Air Inter), "When you buy the first TV set, buy the last Sony"(Sony).
Sutton refers to three different kinds of metonymy: antonomasia, or the use of epithets, for example, Wright as "High Priestess of Infidelity" (84); hypallage, or the switching of attributes, for example, the rhetorical accomplishments the Woman's Building is meant to celebrate are marginalized; and paronomasia, or a slight but telling change of name, for example, public woman as "public woman."
Note also the hypallage describing the dead girl's state as "le double sommeil de l'innocence et de la vertu" (143); through the allegory comparing her body to "la statue de la Virginite endormie" (143); and through the simile of the moon rising "comme une blanche vestale" (144) and, presumably, like Atala's soul.
To cite only a few of the tropes that she herself explicitly names--antonomasia (using a proper name for an attribute, or an attribute for a proper name: "the author says ..." instead of "Cixous says ..."); amphibology (ambiguity; but the etymologies are different--that which is ambiguous goes around something rather than straight at it; that which is amphibologous has been thrown on both sides of something); and hypallage (shifting the application of a word--"the grateful shade" on a hot summer's day, "a wicked wound").
11.63 terraeque inmurmurat);(1) secondly, the use of hypallage of the `sleepless pillow' variety (with the same adjective at Th.
Largely derived from rhetorical theory (probably from Melanchthon, via Lucas Lossius), terms such as hypallage, hypotyposis, parrhesia, pathopoeia, and syncope are used to describe musical procedures, not always in a way one would expect from the rhetorical analogue (indeed, in some cases Burmeister even changed his mind between treatises).