hypallage

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hypallage

(haɪˈpæləˌdʒiː)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a figure of speech in which the natural relations of two words in a statement are interchanged, as in the fire spread the wind
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek hupallagē interchange, from hypo- + allassein to exchange]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hypallage

the deliberate movement for effect and emphasis of one of a group of nouns from a more natural position to one less natural, as Virgil’s “the trumpet’s Tuscan blare” for “the Tuscan trumpet’s blare.” — hypallactic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypallage

The reversal of the usual relationship between two words.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypallage - reversal of the syntactic relation of two words (as in `her beauty's face')
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
a) Tout d'abord, il souligne le fait de la contiguite de deux sensations, sur leur coexistence dans le meme contexte mental (17), a commencer par des hypallages (18).
In this paper, I shall focus on one specific figure of speech, namely hypallage, metaphor's neighbor, which shares some features of metonymy and enthymeme.
The Greek meaning of hypallage is "interchange, exchange"; the most common example is "her beauty's face." In the Cyclops episode of Ulysses, Joyce provides us with hypallage as word play: when Joe Hynes offers the narrator a drink, saying "Could you make a hole in another pint?" the answer is "Could a swim duck?" (405).
"You can scarce," said [my father], "combine two ideas together upon it [love], brother Toby, without an hypallage"--What's that?
Yet the Dickensian hypallage is not the same as Walter Shandy's.
Here are some examples of epithet-transfer hypallage in poetry, before and after Dickens.
The synecdoche of feet (pars pro toto) walking in through the "former door" trails in two cases of hypallage: when they walked in, the owners of the feet were not dead; it is now that some of the people whom they signify are dead and others have changed beyond recognition.
Hypallage thus differs from but is often blended with other tropes.