hyperalert

hyperalert

(ˌhaɪpərəˈlɜːt)
adj
excessively alert
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Delirium can be classified by severity or behavioural categories: hyperalert, hypoalert or a mixture of both; although a small number of patients with delirium do not fit specific delirium classifications.
Then after 30 seconds I felt hyperalert. Maria, 44, said: "As long as you go below -110 it will trigger the fight or flight response.
Dedicated in 1995, its evocative centrepiece consists of 19 stainless steel statues of American soldiers trudging through heavy brush with grim and hyperalert expressions.
This leads to (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181681/) bodily changes  that prepare us to be more efficient in a danger: The brain becomes hyperalert, pupils dilate, the bronchi dilate and breathing accelerates.
Wounded in a shootout, on leave pending an investigation, suffering from mild PTSD, not sure she can afford her tumble-down Carpenter Gothic home, she is hyperalert and vulnerable.
If not, inspect them for condition and seal regularly and be hyperalert for water contamination if the airplane has been parked outside during rain.
The setting, the movement, the rhythm, even the fatigue we all felt: These elements combined to induce the sensation of being in a dream or trance, at once dazed and hyperalert, prompting us to attune ourselves to the very nature of perception and sensation.
Further, they note that counselors "must be hyperalert to the social factors that may influence the decision" (p.
The concept of active hypnosis developed from an observation in social science; Ludwig and Lyle (1964) introduced the concept of "hyperalert" hypnosis to describe people who seemed to be following suggestions in a hypnotized way, while physically very active.
Socially anxious individuals are hyperalert or extremely sensitive for criticism.
A canny reader like John Wilson Croker of the Quarterly (who was First Secretary of the Admiralty and whom the editor Murray assigned the task of silencing Barbauld), would be hyperalert to such dissidence, and these words would carry precisely this ambivalent political meaning with exactly the opposite affective charge.