hyperalert

hyperalert

(ˌhaɪpərəˈlɜːt)
adj
excessively alert
References in periodicals archive ?
Dedicated in 1995, its evocative centrepiece consists of 19 stainless steel statues of American soldiers trudging through heavy brush with grim and hyperalert expressions.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181681/) bodily changes  that prepare us to be more efficient in a danger: The brain becomes hyperalert, pupils dilate, the bronchi dilate and breathing accelerates.
Wounded in a shootout, on leave pending an investigation, suffering from mild PTSD, not sure she can afford her tumble-down Carpenter Gothic home, she is hyperalert and vulnerable.
If not, inspect them for condition and seal regularly and be hyperalert for water contamination if the airplane has been parked outside during rain.
Further, they note that counselors "must be hyperalert to the social factors that may influence the decision" (p.
Socially anxious individuals are hyperalert or extremely sensitive for criticism.
A canny reader like John Wilson Croker of the Quarterly (who was First Secretary of the Admiralty and whom the editor Murray assigned the task of silencing Barbauld), would be hyperalert to such dissidence, and these words would carry precisely this ambivalent political meaning with exactly the opposite affective charge.
11) Sign 0 1 2 3 Tone Normal Hypertonia Hyportonia Flaccid Consciousness Normal Hyperalert, stare Lethargic Comatosed Fits Normal infrequent <3 day frequent >2/day Posture Normal Fisting/cycling Strong, distal Decerebrate flexion Moro Normal Partial Absent Grasp Normal Poor Absent Suck Normal Poor Absent [+ or -] bites Respiration Normal Hyperventilation Brief apnea (Apnoea) Fontanelle Normal Full not tense Tense Table 2: Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) score among different groups Studied group Group I Group II Variables N = 16 N = 19 initial HIE score X [+ or -] SD 7.
Primed to detect threats that no longer exist, some brains remain on hyperalert, giving their owners chronic stress and anxiety disorders.
Red flags include inattention, rambling, incoherent, and/or illogical speech, and an altered level of consciousness (a person with delirium may be hyperalert or drowsy).
The neurological implications of "connectivity"' the hyperalert but quasi-animal state in which much of mankind now passes its days and nights, add up to a physiological revolution.
Delirious persons have disorganized thinking, an altered level of consciousness (hypoalert, hyperalert, or mixed), change in activity level (hyperactive, hypoactive, or mixed), memory impairment, disorientation, and perceptual and sleep-wake disturbances varying over the course of a day (American Psychiatric Association, 2000).