hyperirritable


Also found in: Medical.

hy·per·ir·ri·ta·bil·i·ty

 (hī′pər-ĭr′ĭ-tə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
Excessive response to a stimulus.

hy′per·ir′ri·ta·ble adj.

hyperirritable

(ˌhaɪpərˈɪrɪtəbəl)
adj
excessively responsive or sensitive to a stimulus
References in periodicals archive ?
A myofascial "Trigger Point" (TP) is a hyperirritable point in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule or "knot.
MTrP are recognized as palpable hyperirritable nodules located within taut bands of skeletal muscle (5).
Pain is caused by disturbance of myofascial trigger points (TPs), which are hyperirritable spots in skeletal muscle or in the fascia associated with skeletal muscle.
MMJ Labs LLC, a maker of personal pain control solutions, has received Food and Drug Administration approval for VibraCool, a wearable device designed to provide relief for muscle aches, injuries and myofascial trigger points, or hyperirritable spots in the fascia surrounding skeletal muscles.
Myofascial pain syndrome is a painful musculoskeletal condition initiated from the hyperirritable spot within a taut band of skeletal muscle.
Myofascial trigger points are defined as hyperirritable points located in taut bands of skeletal muscle or fascia which when compressed cause local tenderness and/or referred pain (Simons 2002, Tough et al 2009, Yap 2007).
Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a musculoskleteral pain disorder characterized by pain caused by hyperirritable spots, defined as trigger points (TP), in one or more taut bands of muscle fibers.
Myofascial Trigger Points are described by Travell and Simons1 as hyperirritable loci within a taut band of skeletal muscle or the fascia that surrounds it.
Trigger sites, also known as trigger points or muscle knots, are described as hyperirritable spots in skeletal muscle that are associated with palpable nodules in taut bands of muscle fibers.
This premier issue featured clinical articles on patients with cervical spondylosis, percutaneous cordotomy, hyperirritable carotid sinus mechanism, and traumatic head injury.