hypermasculine


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hypermasculine

(ˌhaɪpəˈmæskjʊlɪn)
adj
(Psychology) psychol characterized by an exaggeration of traditionally masculine traits or behaviour
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
For Loren Glass, the paradoxical nature of modern celebrity inheres in the dialectical engagement between modernity and mass cultural recognition (24); further, these two conflicting impulses are precariously linked by the hypermasculine public personas adopted by modernist authors in response to the "psychosexual trauma" of the "feminized, and feminizing, literary marketplace" (18).
Goodbye to the Crimson Tide fans who worshipped the hypermasculine
1588-92), and Volpone (1606) to demonstrate that even the hypermasculine heroes of these dramas purposefully occupy "feminine" subject positions--but less to contain or silence the female than to secure their omnipotence.
(14) To survive in the anarchic realm of international politics, such analyses suggest, one needs a "masculine" approach and it is vital to have hypermasculine bodies to fight, a process that is vividly illustrated in Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, where we follow the disciplinary culture that attempts to create killing machines out of young men.
"Scripting the macho man: Hypermasculine socialization and enculturation." The Journal of Sex Research 25(1): 60-84.
Fernbach's discussion of Terminator 2 suggests that the hypermasculine cyborg portrays ordinary masculinity as lacking; the Terminator himself represents a fetishised, idealised masculinity that is a desirable alternative.
230) to her black contemporary, Frances Harper, whose more earnest concerns in her novel, Iola Leroy, include the determination to `counteract racist stereotypes of black men as violently hypermasculine' (p.
While the language is openly homophobic, the hypermasculine nature of the occupation allows interactions that could be deemed homoerotic to outside viewers, but which in reality reflect a firm security of identity of the players.
He poses for himself a big question: how did the pirate become the "outrageously hypermasculine antihero" of modern popular culture?
Varda Burstyn ably leads us to consider that although `big time' sport may only include a small part of society as active participants (primarily young males), it affects every one of us through the promotion of "hypermasculine" behaviours and values that permeate popular culture.
"Now when I was naked," observes Kingston's woman warrior, "I was a strange human being indeed--words carved on my back and the baby large in front." In the exhibition catalogue, the hypermasculine Bev Francis grimaces during a power lift, but on the facing page she smiles pacifically, surrounded by husband and children, her muscles, veins and bone ridges softened by fostering flesh.