hypermodern


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hypermodern

(ˌhaɪpəˈmɒdən)
adj
1. (Chess & Draughts) chess relating to a strategy in chess which seeks to control the centre of the board by the use of distant pieces instead of pawns
2. (Art Terms) art referring to an extreme movement in art and culture distinct from modernism and postmodernism
3. relating to the intensification of modernity
References in periodicals archive ?
I've just finished the final stage of a book with professor of sociology Ikki Kim that compares Beijing and Seoul at different stages of their development, titled, "Beijing to Seoul, Modern to Hypermodern," which visually documents the former city's journey through modernity, and takes the latter as an example of the cradle of hypermodernity that will soon engulf all of humanity.
According to CEO Bas Tolmeijer, Bidroom's workforce will expand to 200 employees within the next year after the company moves into a new, hypermodern office in Krakow in April 2019.
After the bus transporting the characters arrives in Brasilia, images of the city's hypermodern architecture and the presidential palace dominate focus.
Every era can be described as either the best or the worst in what it harbours in terms of hope and dismay This is particularly relevant when we consider the challenges associated with social acceleration today While social acceleration bears the promise of a densely filled life for some, others experience the pathologies of excess and meaninglessness caused by the extreme pressures of a hypermodern world.
These fast expanding businesses and hypermodern sectors come with the kinds of specialty risks that Lloyd's has always been a pioneer in.
In his new book, "The Terminal Self: Everyday Life in Hypermodern Times," Gottschalk examines the social and psychological toll of increasingly online lives on work, education, family life, interactions, our sense of self and more.
In this hypermodern media landscape, the rise of digital networks has defined new forms of sociability shaped by technological temporality and speed of information transmission toward, what the Italian philosopher Paul Virilio has described as, "global time" (Virilio, 1999).
He even considers Darwin's conception of nature to be "hypermodern" despite the style in which it was expressed (54).