hypermodernism


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hypermodernism

(ˌhaɪpəˈmɒdənɪzəm)
n
1. (Chess & Draughts) a hypermodern approach or theory
2. (Art Terms) a hypermodern approach or theory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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--Fifthly; hypermodernism is distinguished from postmodernism because the latter did not reckon major changes in contemporary society.
The use of the notion of postmodernism to reflect on contemporary art and culture seems to be loosing importance in general scholarship and new notions like Hypermodernism (Lipovetsky, 2005), Digimodernism (Kirby, 2009) and Metamodernism (Vermeulen & van den Akker, 2010) have been suggested to discuss the 21st Century aesthetic production.
Lipovetsky (2005) speaks about hypermodernism, whose cultural practices and social relations are linked to hyperconsumerism.
Within this framework, for a better understanding of today, if I exclude Gilles Lipovetsky's (2005) "hypermodernism" and Alan Kirby's (2009) "digimodernism" for the reason that the first concentrate on the general picture of postmodernism only, and the latter has a tendency not to see the "positive sides" of postmodernism within its severe critical perspectives.
Skjoldager and Nielsen have compiled a remarkable biography about Aron Nimzowitsch, a chess legend who was first taught by his father at the age of eight and later founded the Hypermodernism school of chess.
We should take these words as "evaluation of conditions." If we generally accept that Islamism was born in the 19th century "in modern conditions as a response to modernism," Islamism will continue to exist as long as "modernism, postmodernism, and hypermodernism" exist, since this is what its nature requires.
Another philosopher of hypermodernism, Franco Berardi, writes that "Only today, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, does dystopia take center stage and conquer the whole field of the artistic imagination, thus drawing the narrative horizon of the century with no future" (2008, 43).
(12.) Paul Virilio, Open Sky, London, Verso, 1997; John Armitage (ed), Paul Virilio: From Modernism to Hypermodernism and Beyond, London, Sage, 2000; Steve Redhead, Paul Virilio: Theorist for an Accelerated Culture, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 2004.
I would call his position postmodern, except that that term has been preempted to describe the hypermodernism, or late modernism in decay, that shares with Solzhenitsyn's position only a sense that the Enlightenment project is nearing exhaustion.
In contrast to this hypermodernism, most authentic conservative thought assumes a more genuinely critical stance toward the modern project.
In the midst of our hypermodernism, let us remember the oldnew call of the Almighty after the flood to a global covenant of human responsibility and hope.
(6.) `From modernism to hypermodernism and beyond', in Virilio Live: Selected Interviews, edited by John Armitage, London, Sage 2001, p.