hypermutability

hypermutability

(ˌhaɪpəˈmjuːtəbɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
(Medicine) med a rapid occurrence of mutation
References in periodicals archive ?
Microsatellite instability (MSI) [3] is a molecular diagnostic finding in oncology that reflects a state of genomic hypermutability. Spontaneous gains or losses of nucleotides from DNA in repetitive tracts are the pathognomonic finding of MSI and serve as the basis for its clinical diagnosis (1).
Teinturier et al., "PROP1 gene screening in patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency reveals two sites of hypermutability and a high incidence of corticotroph deficiency," The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol.
DNA damage to both the mitochondrial and nuclear genome from endogenous as well as exogenous insults results in accumulation of genetic aberrations and genome hypermutability [8-10].
Fluoroquinolone resistance in Haemophilus influenzae is associated with hypermutability. Antimicrob Agents Chemother.
Also, additional factors such as hypermutability must be accounted for when estimating population sizes from discordant gene/species trees.
1986), immune systems (Klein 1990), sexual selection (Hamilton and Zuk 1982), sexual recombination (Jaenike 1978; Hamilton 1980) and hypermutability (Moxon et al.
DNA damage to both mitochondrial and nuclear genome from endogenous as well as exogenous insults results in accumulation of genetic aberrations and genome hypermutability [8-10].
In mycobacteria, hypermutability was demonstrated in vitro for M.
Hypermutability of CpG dinucleotides in the propeptide sequence of the human albumin gene.
The tetranucleotide repeat polymorphis D21S1245 demonstrates hypermutability in germline and somatic cells.